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Question for the "sharpies"..

My understanding of the theory on a Fishfinder Rig (when fishing cut bait) is that when a fish takes the bait it will not feel or sense the weight of the sinker. This may result in a finicky fish that just nibbles the bait determining that all is good and then swallow the bait.

I have often wondered that in order for a fishfinder rig to work correctly there should be no tension on the line. If we maintain "tight lines" with even just a slight bend into the rod... well that fish may not feel the sinker weight but has to feel the tensioned line? If this is correct.... why bother with a fishfinder rig at all?
 

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FR

First off I don't deadstick,therefore at the slightest pickup,or hit I bow the rod ,read the runoff and set the hook,secondly the fish finder rig allows you to walk the bait back,cover ground,and impart movement to the bait,you should also adjust lead weight to tide lite tide lite weight,sometimes no weight.So it comes down to your preference and area fishing.Tight linesKAREN ANN CHARTERS
 

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I do think fish can really feel the sinker when it hits and run. I find it very troublesome to use when, it is windy, I need to cast far, I want to avoid the crabs nibbling on my bait, and the fishfinder plastic cuts my line.

I switched to high and low rig. It is cheaper to make and cast better for my "conditions". :)

I think the fishfinder is good sometimes and the high and low is good for the other times. More like 90% of my fish are caught on the high-low rig.

Enjoy fishing and throw back the ones you cant eat.
 

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High Low RIG

Is this the metal thing that has 2 things sticking out for 2 hooks? More for like porgy fishing? I bought a few last year but do not know how to use them.. There is no hole for me to tie my weight to on the bottom..

-Steve
 

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option

Another option instead of tying dropper loops is to use "bear claws". These little plastic torpedo shapped items make it real easy to add a high rig to a line without tying knots.

They are very easy to put on and take off, which makes it nice if you want to change a setup quickly.

One advantage to these is that they don't weaken the line like knots do.
 

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I agree that a fishfinder rig can potentially cut back a bit on casting distance. But I think the benefits out way the draw backs.

It's very unusual to have total tension on a bait sticked line. Even a light surf can put a little belly into the line. But even with a totally taught line, I have to presume the weight of the tension on the line is still less than the weight of a heavy surf sinker.
 

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It's all in the drag setting

When chunking from the shore and using bait if the fish are not on an "aggressive feed" a fishfinder I have found hooks up about three to one over a fixed rig.

The important thing is after casting setting your drag just tight enough to keep the line taught but where a fish can run if he picks up the bait and starts to swim.

I have found that a larger bass will even let go of the bait if he feels the "alarm clicker" on conventional rigs in a lot of water conditions.

If a lot of fish are around and being competitive for your offering things get a lot easier. Or when fishing a rougher surf.

But when your fishing for a "resident fish" that is policeing his territory or in the morning for his breakfast or in calmer waters there is nothing better than a fishfinder. Keep in mind I am stating this strickly from chunking from the beach. When your off a jetty or boat or pier things change because the angle of your line into the water changes.

Hope this all makes sense.
 
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