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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm building a blackfish rod and would like to use a Newell 229-3.6 when its finished. My toggin buddy says not to get one because he says he's seen many Newells fail. I would like to get one because I like the light weight of the reel, plus a lot of guys use them so they can't be all that bad. My buddy will razz me if I get one, especially if it breaks.

I am asking the members of this site for any comments or complaints about Newell reels, it would greatly help my purchase decision. Thanks
 

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Raekwon, one of the regulars on a party boat I go on uses that reel for togg'n. Never heard him complain about it and it seems to work very well.

You might want to check out the Ticas as they seem to be a topnotch reel as well.
 

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The older Newells are built much better than the current models. More plastic, lower quality bearings, lower quality machining.

In the lighter series (200's and 300's) it's OK, but more prone to failure for the bigger models. Handle and frame failures are the most common breakdowns. Never cranked hard with a 200 series but remember that handle is made of plastic.

On the plus side, they are very light and comfortable to fish with and an excellent casting reel, just not a precision reel.

If you can find a vintage Newell, get it, but be prepared to spend bux unless you find it in a garage sale by a non-fisherman.

For the money of a Newell, I'd rather go with a Daiwa SLX40SHV; narrow spool, light, excellent drag, casts great, bulletproof and a precision tool. An excellent reel to crank hard with.
 

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I own a 229 and I do like it a lot for bottom fishing as it's light and not at all tiring to hold all day. I must admit that when I lived in Florida, I saw many Newells seize when put under extreme stress, such as a large tarpon.
 

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Change Out the Drage

Change our the dray to Smoothies or Super Smoothies or Shimanol Wet Drag system. You'll be glad you did.

In terms of toggin - that reel should be fine.

I go a little heavier know that the average size of the tog I've been catching is getting bigger the last couple of years.

I fish a custom lami glass rod with a Penn Jigmaster loaded with 50lb Ande. Switched to that afer I lost and watched guys loose a lot of quality tog because they coldn't move them quick enough off the bottom.
 

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I personally have just about every reel in the market and I still have a place for my Newell reels!

Crag is right…. The older models are better made. However, if you are planning to tog with it… You can't go wrong with a Newell 229 or 332. The price is right, it's light, it casts and its very comfortable!

"Crazy" Alberto
[email protected]
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks

Thanks for the advice, guys. I will go to the tackle shop one day this week and play with the Newell reels, and I'll also keep an eye out for any old ones for sale.

Another reel I was considering is the Diawa Sealine 40 HSD, its a little heavier because its aluminum. Also has a solid drag: ten stainless and teflon/graphite composite discs. I think the reel is new for this year, anybody get a chance to check one out in person?
 
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Old Newells

Old Newells are old. Like 25 years old. They have always been high maintenace reels and die quickly in saltwater unless maintained. So unless you are really lucky, picking up a clean P or G is going to run $200+ and will be a well used reel. Unless you know your Newells, more than likely you will be buying a fixer-upper. Don't. Parts are rare, not available from the factory a lot of times, and very expensive when you do find them. For instance, the freespool lever from a P series sells for up to $40 new. An aluminum base and clamp in fair condition can be $60. Buy a new Newell. An S with a metal left side bearing cap. There is not an issue with Newells that cannot be quickly patched with Penn or Newell parts. Make sure that the shop you buy from stocks Newell parts and does reel repairs. Causeway for instance. Get the reel serviced each year. Don't mess with it unless you are just relubing it. Don't assume that parts from any other Newell will integrate perfectly with yours. Fixing a Newell properly means having an infinite amount of parts and trying them all. A properly tuned Newell will freespool for over a minute and outcast any other reel. Check out several Newells and pick the best one. Spins a long time, no weird noises, drag has over 1 turn of adjustment, etc. That's it. No other problems.
 

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JudFisher wrote:
Old Newells are old. Like 25 years old. They have always been high maintenace reels and die quickly in saltwater unless maintained. So unless you are really lucky, picking up a clean P or G is going to run $200+ and will be a well used reel. Unless you know your Newells, more than likely you will be buying a fixer-upper …..

… Don't assume that parts from any other Newell will integrate perfectly with yours. Fixing a Newell properly means having an infinite amount of parts and trying them all. A properly tuned Newell will freespool for over a minute and outcast any other reel. Check out several Newells and pick the best one. Spins a long time, no weird noises, drag has over 1 turn of adjustment, etc. That's it. No other problems.

________________________________________________________________

Hey Jud,
How are ya buddy?
Thanks for your reply and that's a valid point! Like any good old reel, it needs a lot of TLC! However, the old "P & G" series are still highly prized by many sharpies because it is great for bottom/wreck fishing and it has incredible power! Also, when it is fine tuned, it's a great casting reel for hardy pluggers and chunkers!

Ever since Mr. Carl (founder) decided to change management during the mid 80's, the quality suffered (due to plastic components) and lost most of the market share. The management went through some reorganization and the new versions are not all that bad and the price is right!

Just wondering… do you have any old "P" series around and collecting dust? You know how to reach me. ;)

"Crazy" Alberto
[email protected]
 

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The current "S" series Newells are adequate for bottom fishing for species like tog.

The 229 and 235 are good reels for togging, my personal choice is the 338 3.6. A little more line capacity helps in deeper water.

Agree with previous posts...smoothie drags are very helpful.

-FWW
 

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too fast

reef man

I have the 540-4.6(?). I was jigging cod in Green Harbor three weeks ago and thought that that speed was even a little fast. A fully spooled 540 takes up a lot of line even at the low speed.

If I could regear mine down to the next speed I would. Codfishing deep water is a lot of work. Go for the slower reel - you'll be glad you did.
 
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Clicker is weak

No trolling with a Newell.

How else would you destroy a clicker?

Very easy to change and metal clicker kits are available.

Get the 3.2 gear ratio for cod. Not easy to switch with higher gears. Cheaper to buy a new reel.
 

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540. 5.5

Reef man

That's my favorite reel for jigging cod and I bought it just for that purpose. Put a dacron backing on it then 300 yds of 65lb power pro and your all set.

I like it because it is real fast. When it is time to move or when a small thing gets snagged it's up in no time at all. If you get a cod you just take your time with a steady crank (don't pump them at all). I changed the drag washers to a wet system which makes them real smooth.

Capt. Marc
 

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Reef Man,

Check out the Progear 454, if you plan to use braid. The 440 is wider and a bit more awkward than the 454 and the 454 holds more than enough braid to fish the deepest of water with ample line to spare. If you plan to fish mono, the 440 is probably the way to go.

Gamakatsu
 
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Bunny Clark & Helen-H

The Bunny Clark sails from Maine and uses PG, Newell and Penn reels. From what I hear, the PG are by far their highest maintenance reels. To the extent that they have to be highly modified before their first use. The captain goes back and forth on being a PG proponent, versus just dropping them and going back to Newell and Penn.

The Helen-H has PG's on their rentals. Again, I hear that they are a high maintenance reel.

I love the PG handle. and the 454 is without a doubt an awesome pulling reel. I just have never fished mine enough to be concerned about long term maintenance and durability.

Newells have the worst handle on any production reel. But they weigh nothing and are great casting reels. And 3.2 gears will rip a double header of 15# cod off the bottom with ease.
 
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Newells are great for skate fishing

I catch skates all the time with Newells.I catch more skates wiht them than any other reel .skates tast good YYUUUMMMYYY!!!!!
 
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