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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was wondering why my ten foot surf rod has only five guides including the tip when my seven foot conventional and spinning rods that I use on the boat each have ten guides includeing the tip. It seems to me that the more guides the better. The line stays straighter and therefore slaps around less. Friction isn't really a factor with today's guides is it? I saw a show, where they were building fly rods and they placed the guides on the rod according to the wavelength that the line has while traveling through the guides. Why would the number of guides on the different rods vary so much.
 

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Hi Doughboy,

Usually the 10'spin surf rods I build have 5 guides on them.

As a rule I usually use an extra guide rather than one less.

A good ceramic guide today does generate less friction than the older guides. I use Fuji Hardloy guides most of the time and Fuji SIC (Silicon carbide)guides for the special situations. Use the best components for the task at hand.

With out seeing your 7' rods it is hard to say if they have too many guides or not.

A rule of thumb for conventional rod is the length of the rod in feet plus 1. 6' rod =7

For spin rods it is the length in feet - 1. 6' rod = 5 guides.

REMEMBER this is a rule of thumb. Each blank is an individual item and should be treated accordingly. That is why I static deflect each rod I build to determine how many guides and where to position them.

A trick, use high frame guides and you can use less guides. Works great on spin rods BUT will introduce more torque in a conventional rod with guides installed on top of blank. This increased torque will cause rod to twist to either side.

A conventional surf rod will have 8-12 guides on it depending on length and flex.

How flexible a blank is will also determine how many guides are needed to transport the line parallel to the blank without touching the blank while the blank is flexed.

All this is really pretty simple once you use it to your advantage. The idea is to use the correct # of guides to give maximum performance.

Hope I answered your questions satisfactorially.

Capt Neil

Have Fun Fishing. Capt Neil
Custom Fishing Rods by Captain Neil



This message was edited by Captneilf on 11-22-01 @ 9:22 PM
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you very much for all the info. It definately seems like there is a lot to consider. I was just curious because on my surf rod the knot attaching the leader to the line often catches the line when I cast if I reel it in through the tip guide. But on my seven footers I never have a problem. It seems like the line is looping more with the fewer guides on the surf rod and therefore gets caught more. Now I just use a shorter leader. I appreciate the detailed response and hope you had a good turkey day. Thanks again.

Chris
 

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Hi Doughboy,

I use a #20 ring on the tip top when i build spin surf rods. The smallest guide is usually a # 20 so a #20 tip top is fine and the knot or swivel doesn't catch.

If you would like to discuss the guiding on those other rods I would be glad to. I will be at the Lindenhurst Fishermans Flea Market this Sat OR you can stop by the shop in Sayville. In either case bring the rods and we can see whats what.

Capt Neil

Have Fun Fishing. Capt Neil
Custom Fishing Rods by Captain Neil
 
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