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Starrstriper,
I hope that you don't mind, but I took the liberty of cutting and pasting your post from baitboy's string. It is far too important to be attached to a string that nobody is interested in anymore. Below is Starrstriper's post:

here is something of interest to ALL of us who use the eastern shore. the bunker dragers? rapeing our shore and turning the staple bait fish into chicken feed? I got this from another non-profit striper forum i'm copy ing and pasting from the other site but any help is appreciated? it's a bigger crime than keeping a short or two (which i frown heavily upon)

time is running short on this vote is scheduled for december 17th i belive?

I could not find the thread I was looking for but here is the bunker bill for NJ and the senators for nj to influence:

SENATE, No. 2252

STATE OF NEW JERSEY

209th LEGISLATURE

INTRODUCED MARCH 29, 2001

Sponsored by:

Senator ANDREW R. CIESLA

District 10 (Monmouth and Ocean)

Senator C. LOUIS BASSANO

District 21 (Essex and Union)

Co-Sponsored by:

Senators Allen, Vitale and Zane

SYNOPSIS

Prohibits the taking of menhaden for fish meal reduction in State coastal waters.

CURRENT VERSION OF TEXT

As introduced.

(Sponsorship Updated As Of: 10/4/2001)

An Act concerning the taking of menhaden and amending R.S.23:3-51.

Be It Enacted by the Senate and General Assembly of the State of New Jersey:

1. R.S.23:3-51 is amended to read as follows:

23:3-51. a. A person intending to take menhaden with purse or shirred nets in any waters in the jurisdiction of this State, including the waters of the Atlantic ocean, within [3] three nautical miles of the coast line of this State, shall apply to the commissioner for a license therefor. The commissioner, upon the receipt of the application and payment [to him]of the fee provided in section 23:3-52 of this Title, may, [in his discretion] at the commissioner's discretion , issue to the applicant a license, to take menhaden [with purse or shirred nets], except as prohibited in subsection b. of this section. The license shall be void after December 31 next succeeding its issuance.

b. Notwithstanding the provisions of subsection a. of this section or any other law, or any rule or regulation adopted pursuant thereto, to the contrary, no commissioner shall issue a license for the taking of menhaden, and no person may take menhaden for the purpose of reduction, including conversion to fish meal, oil and other components, in State coastal waters, including Delaware, Great, Raritan, and Sandy Hook bays.

(cf: P.L.1979, c.199, s.66)

2. This act shall take effect immediately.

STATEMENT

This bill prohibits the taking of menhaden for fish meal reduction in State coastal waters, including in the Delaware, Great, Raritan or Sandy Hook bays.

comment by a rec. fisherman like ourselves:

Guys, it may not be the most important thing this year, but it is still important if we want to get the sea rapists out of our waters. We need to get this done this year, before the Senate recesses, or it will never get done (or at least will not get done for quite some time). Please take the time to send these faxes out today. Omega Protein is pulling out all the stops to kill this now. Don't let them succeed, not when we have come this far. Not when we have the truth on our side.
__________ ---- _________
Dogs,
Here is 5 Senators for today and 5 more will follow everyday.
A letter for the governor will be included tomorrow.

We are still trying to get a committment for holding the vote on Dec. 17th.

Please call you individual Senators and ask them if they have committed to voting "Yes" yet and if so, why not.

Please email their response to [email protected]
------------------------------------

PHONE NUMBER (856)-848-1102

{Your Name}
{Your Address}

November 28, 2001

VIA FACSIMILE 856-845-3619

Senator Raymond J. Zane
The White House, Suite 3
39 S. Broad St.
Woodbury, NJ 08096-7921

Re: S.2252, ?The Bunker Bill?

Dear Senator Zane:
Soon you will be asked to consider and vote upon S. 2252, a bill to protect menhaden from being taken for reduction while in New Jersey waters.

As a member of the Salty Dog Organization, an ad-hoc group of New Jersey salt-water anglers and environmentalists, I respectfully request that you vote ?Yes? on S.2252 for the following reasons.

According to the recent Marine Recreational Survey, recreational fishing contributes over $1.5 billion to the New Jersey economy and adds to the quality of life of over 1 million residents. The survival of this industry and way of life depends on robust stocks of fish and a healthy marine environment.

Furthermore, menhaden fuel a thriving New Jersey commercial bait industry that uses relatively small, selective fishing gear to harvest menhaden.

Menhaden largely provide the foundation for the marine food chain in New Jersey waters. Due to predator/prey relationships, stocks of fish that the recreational fishing industry depends on such as bluefish, striped bass, summer flounder, and weakfish are dependent upon healthy stocks of menhaden.

Since the reduction industry is not allowed to operate in the waters of Delaware, Maryland, or New York, they focus their efforts in our waters. The reduction industry is denying the predatory fish the food that they depend upon.

Menhaden also contribute significantly to the quality of the marine waters. As filter feeders who remove phytoplankton and plant detritus, (Decaying Organic Matter) menhaden help to clean New Jersey?s marine waters through their unique capacity to remove excess nutrients from the water column and rejuvenating our waters. In a study done by marine biologist Sara Gottieg at the University of Maryland, she estimated that for Chesapeake Bay, this ecological function of removing excess nutrients is worth up to $90 million per annum counting only the reduction in nitrogen and not the other nutrient, phosphorous, that algae also contains. Extrapolating from the data above, menhaden are performing as roving sewerage treatment plants, a function worth at least $20 million per annum to New Jersey.

According to data compiled by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection's Bureau of Marine Water Monitoring, Oxygen levels in many of the waters between the barrier islands and mainland have dropped to perilously low levels each summer since 1992. Richard H. Colby, a member of the Park and Environment Advisory Board of Atlantic County and a biology professor at Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, was quoted in the September 10, 2000, edition of the Atlantic City Press last year as saying, ?If oxygen continues to be low, it will decrease the level of animal life in the water, including eels and all the species of marine fish that go through their early-life stages in the brackish waters of the bays and tidal rivers. It has the potential to have a tremendous impact on the fishing industry."

Protected Ospreys too, rely on menhaden as the basis of their diet. Kathleen Clark who is a principal zoologist with the State Division of Fish Game and Wildlife's Endangered Species Program was quoted in the August 17, 2000 edition of The Atlantic City Press as saying, ?a lack of food, particularly menhaden, in the Great Bay area might be the cause of a recent slight decline in osprey offspring in the area. Osprey will eat a variety of fish, but prefer hunting menhaden, and we haven't been seeing a lot of menhaden."

Despite all the benefits that menhaden provide for New Jersey, we are one of the few states that allow The Omega Protein Corporation, headquartered in Houston, Texas with operations based out of Virginia and North Carolina, to remove mass quantities of an extremely valuable resource at the expense of in-state businesses.

Omega Protein Corporation offers no economic benefit to New Jersey. Omega Protein purchases a permit that cost about $110 from the State of New Jersey. Omega Protein pays no taxes in New Jersey, and provides no jobs in New Jersey.

Sir, based on this information, there is clearly no good reason not to vote in favor of S.2252. This Bill is good for the New Jersey marine environment and good for New Jersey?s anglers. Thank you for your time and consideration.

Sincerely,
-------------------

PHONE (856) 228-8552
EMAIL Sen [email protected]

{Your Name}
{Your Address}

November 28, 2001

VIA FACSIMILE 856-228-1925

Senator John J. Matheussen
Suite 2-B Greentree Building
P.O. Box 8019
Turnersville, NJ 08012

Re: S.2252, ?The Bunker Bill?

Dear Senator Matheussen:

Soon you will be asked to consider and vote upon S. 2252, a bill to protect menhaden from being taken for reduction while in New Jersey waters.

As a member of the Salty Dog Organization, an ad-hoc group of New Jersey salt-water anglers and environmentalists, I respectfully request that you vote ?Yes? on S.2252 for the following reasons.

According to the recent Marine Recreational Survey, recreational fishing contributes over $1.5 billion to the New Jersey economy and adds to the quality of life of over 1 million residents. The survival of this industry and way of life depends on robust stocks of fish and a healthy marine environment.

Furthermore, menhaden fuel a thriving New Jersey commercial bait industry that uses relatively small, selective fishing gear to harvest menhaden.

Menhaden largely provide the foundation for the marine food chain in New Jersey waters. Due to predator/prey relationships, stocks of fish that the recreational fishing industry depends on such as bluefish, striped bass, summer flounder, and weakfish are dependent upon healthy stocks of menhaden. Since the reduction industry is not allowed to operate in the waters of Delaware, Maryland, or New York, they focus their efforts in our waters. The reduction industry is denying the predatory fish the food that they depend upon.

Menhaden also contribute significantly to the quality of the marine waters. As filter feeders who remove phytoplankton and plant detritus, (Decaying Organic Matter) menhaden help to clean New Jersey?s marine waters through their unique capacity to remove excess nutrients from the water column and rejuvenating our waters. In a study done by marine biologist Sara Gottieg at the University of Maryland, she estimated that for Chesapeake Bay, this ecological function of removing excess nutrients is worth up to $90 million per annum counting only the reduction in nitrogen and not the other nutrient, phosphorous, that algae also contains. Extrapolating from the data above, menhaden are performing as roving sewerage treatment plants, a function worth at least $20 million per annum to New Jersey.

According to data compiled by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection's Bureau of Marine Water Monitoring, Oxygen levels in many of the waters between the barrier islands and mainland have dropped to perilously low levels each summer since 1992. Richard H. Colby, a member of the Park and Environment Advisory Board of Atlantic County and a biology professor at Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, was quoted in the September 10, 2000, edition of the Atlantic City Press last year as saying, ?If oxygen continues to be low, it will decrease the level of animal life in the water, including eels and all the species of marine fish that go through their early-life stages in the brackish waters of the bays and tidal rivers. It has the potential to have a tremendous impact on the fishing industry."

Protected Ospreys too, rely on menhaden as the basis of their diet. Kathleen Clark who is a principal zoologist with the State Division of Fish Game and Wildlife's Endangered Species Program was quoted in the August 17, 2000 edition of The Atlantic City Press as saying, ?a lack of food, particularly menhaden, in the Great Bay area might be the cause of a recent slight decline in osprey offspring in the area. Osprey will eat a variety of fish, but prefer hunting menhaden, and we haven't been seeing a lot of menhaden."

Despite all the benefits that menhaden provide for New Jersey, we are one of the few states that allow The Omega Protein Corporation, headquartered in Houston, Texas with operations based out of Virginia and North Carolina, to remove mass quantities of an extremely valuable resource at the expense of in-state businesses. Omega Protein Corporation offers no economic benefit to New Jersey.

Omega Protein purchases a permit that cost about $110 from the State of New Jersey. Omega Protein pays no taxes in New Jersey, and provides no jobs in New Jersey.

Sir, based on this information, there is clearly no good reason not to vote in favor of S.2252. This Bill is good for the New Jersey marine environment and good for New Jersey?s anglers. Thank you for your time and consideration.

Sincerely,

--------------------------
PHONE NUMBER: (856) 757-0552
E-MAIL ADDRESS: [email protected]

{Your Name}
{Your Address}

November 28, 2001

VIA FACSIMILE 856-541-0426

Senator Wayne R. Bryant (Esq.)
501 Cooper Street
Camden, NJ 08102-1240

Re: S.2252, ?The Bunker Bill?

Dear Senator Bryant:

Soon you will be asked to consider and vote upon S. 2252, a bill to protect menhaden from being taken for reduction while in New Jersey waters.

As a member of the Salty Dog Organization, an ad-hoc group of New Jersey salt-water anglers and environmentalists, I respectfully request that you vote ?Yes? on S.2252 for the following reasons.

According to the recent Marine Recreational Survey, recreational fishing contributes over $1.5 billion to the New Jersey economy and adds to the quality of life of over 1 million residents. The survival of this industry and way of life depends on robust stocks of fish and a healthy marine environment. Furthermore, menhaden fuel a thriving New Jersey commercial bait industry that uses relatively small, selective fishing gear to harvest menhaden.

Menhaden largely provide the foundation for the marine food chain in New Jersey waters. Due to predator/prey relationships, stocks of fish that the recreational fishing industry depends on such as bluefish, striped bass, summer flounder, and weakfish are dependent upon healthy stocks of menhaden. Since the reduction industry is not allowed to operate in the waters of Delaware, Maryland, or New York, they focus their efforts in our waters. The reduction industry is denying the predatory fish the food that they depend upon.

Menhaden also contribute significantly to the quality of the marine waters. As filter feeders who remove phytoplankton and plant detritus, (Decaying Organic Matter) menhaden help to clean New Jersey?s marine waters through their unique capacity to remove excess nutrients from the water column and rejuvenating our waters. In a study done by marine biologist Sara Gottieg at the University of Maryland, she estimated that for Chesapeake Bay, this ecological function of removing excess nutrients is worth up to $90 million per annum counting only the reduction in nitrogen and not the other nutrient, phosphorous, that algae also contains. Extrapolating from the data above, menhaden are performing as roving sewerage treatment plants, a function worth at least $20 million per annum to New Jersey.

According to data compiled by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection's Bureau of Marine Water Monitoring, Oxygen levels in many of the waters between the barrier islands and mainland have dropped to perilously low levels each summer since 1992. Richard H. Colby, a member of the Park and Environment Advisory Board of Atlantic County and a biology professor at Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, was quoted in the September 10, 2000, edition of the Atlantic City Press last year as saying, ?If oxygen continues to be low, it will decrease the level of animal life in the water, including eels and all the species of marine fish that go through their early-life stages in the brackish waters of the bays and tidal rivers. It has the potential to have a tremendous impact on the fishing industry."

Protected Ospreys too, rely on menhaden as the basis of their diet. Kathleen Clark who is a principal zoologist with the State Division of Fish Game and Wildlife's Endangered Species Program was quoted in the August 17, 2000 edition of The Atlantic City Press as saying, ?a lack of food, particularly menhaden, in the Great Bay area might be the cause of a recent slight decline in osprey offspring in the area. Osprey will eat a variety of fish, but prefer hunting menhaden, and we haven't been seeing a lot of menhaden."

Despite all the benefits that menhaden provide for New Jersey, we are one of the few states that allow The Omega Protein Corporation, headquartered in Houston, Texas with operations based out of Virginia and North Carolina, to remove mass quantities of an extremely valuable resource at the expense of in-state businesses.

Omega Protein Corporation offers no economic benefit to New Jersey. Omega Protein purchases a permit that cost about $110 from the State of New Jersey. Omega Protein pays no taxes in New Jersey, and provides no jobs in New Jersey.

Sir, based on this information, there is clearly no good reason not to vote in favor of S.2252. This Bill is good for the New Jersey marine environment and good for New Jersey?s anglers. Thank you for your time and consideration.

Sincerely

----------------------------
PHONE NUMBER: Burlington (609) 239-2800
E-MAIL ADDRESS: [email protected]

{Your Name}
{Your Address}

November 28, 2001

VIA FACSIMILE 856-845-3619

Senator Diane B. Allen
2313 Burlington-Mt. Holly Road
Burlington, NJ 08016

Re: S.2252, ?The Bunker Bill?

Dear Senator Allen:

Soon you will be asked to consider and vote upon S. 2252, a bill to protect menhaden from being taken for reduction while in New Jersey waters.

As a member of the Salty Dog Organization, an ad-hoc group of New Jersey salt-water anglers and environmentalists, I respectfully request that you vote ?Yes? on S.2252 for the following reasons.

According to the recent Marine Recreational Survey, recreational fishing contributes over $1.5 billion to the New Jersey economy and adds to the quality of life of over 1 million residents. The survival of this industry and way of life depends on robust stocks of fish and a healthy marine environment. Furthermore, menhaden fuel a thriving New Jersey commercial bait industry that uses relatively small, selective fishing gear to harvest menhaden.

Menhaden largely provide the foundation for the marine food chain in New Jersey waters. Due to predator/prey relationships, stocks of fish that the recreational fishing industry depends on such as bluefish, striped bass, summer flounder, and weakfish are dependent upon healthy stocks of menhaden. Since the reduction industry is not allowed to operate in the waters of Delaware, Maryland, or New York, they focus their efforts in our waters. The reduction industry is denying the predatory fish the food that they depend upon.

Menhaden also contribute significantly to the quality of the marine waters. As filter feeders who remove phytoplankton and plant detritus, (Decaying Organic Matter) menhaden help to clean New Jersey?s marine waters through their unique capacity to remove excess nutrients from the water column and rejuvenating our waters.

In a study done by marine biologist Sara Gottieg at the University of Maryland, she estimated that for Chesapeake Bay, this ecological function of removing excess nutrients is worth up to $90 million per annum counting only the reduction in nitrogen and not the other nutrient, phosphorous, that algae also contains.

Extrapolating from the data above, menhaden are performing as roving sewerage treatment plants, a function worth at least $20 million per annum to New Jersey.

According to data compiled by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection's Bureau of Marine Water Monitoring, Oxygen levels in many of the waters between the barrier islands and mainland have dropped to perilously low levels each summer since 1992. Richard H. Colby, a member of the Park and Environment Advisory Board of Atlantic County and a biology professor at Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, was quoted in the September 10, 2000, edition of the Atlantic City Press last year as saying, ?If oxygen continues to be low, it will decrease the level of animal life in the water, including eels and all the species of marine fish that go through their early-life stages in the brackish waters of the bays and tidal rivers. It has the potential to have a tremendous impact on the fishing industry."

Protected Ospreys too, rely on menhaden as the basis of their diet. Kathleen Clark who is a principal zoologist with the State Division of Fish Game and Wildlife's Endangered Species Program was quoted in the August 17, 2000 edition of The Atlantic City Press as saying, ?a lack of food, particularly menhaden, in the Great Bay area might be the cause of a recent slight decline in osprey offspring in the area. Osprey will eat a variety of fish, but prefer hunting menhaden, and we haven't been seeing a lot of menhaden."

Despite all the benefits that menhaden provide for New Jersey, we are one of the few states that allow The Omega Protein Corporation, headquartered in Houston, Texas with operations based out of Virginia and North Carolina, to remove mass quantities of an extremely valuable resource at the expense of in-state businesses.

Omega Protein Corporation offers no economic benefit to New Jersey. Omega Protein purchases a permit that cost about $110 from the State of New Jersey. Omega Protein pays no taxes in New Jersey, and provides no jobs in New Jersey.

Senator, based on this information, there is clearly no good reason not to vote in favor of S.2252. This Bill is good for the New Jersey marine environment and good for New Jersey?s anglers. Thank you for your time and consideration.

Sincerely,

-----------------------

PHONE NUMBER: (856) 234-8080
E-MAIL ADDRESS: [email protected]

{Your Name}
{Your Address}

November 28, 2001

VIA FACSIMILE 856-234-3990

Senator Martha W. Bark
Suite 103
3000 Midlantic Drive
Mt. Laurel, NJ 08054

Re: S.2252, ?The Bunker Bill?

Dear Senator Bark:

Soon you will be asked to consider and vote upon S. 2252, a bill to protect menhaden from being taken for reduction while in New Jersey waters.

As a member of the Salty Dog Organization, an ad-hoc group of New Jersey salt-water anglers and environmentalists, I respectfully request that you vote ?Yes? on S.2252 for the following reasons.

According to the recent Marine Recreational Survey, recreational fishing contributes over $1.5 billion to the New Jersey economy and adds to the quality of life of over 1 million residents. The survival of this industry and way of life depends on robust stocks of fish and a healthy marine environment. Furthermore, menhaden fuel a thriving New Jersey commercial bait industry that uses relatively small, selective fishing gear to harvest menhaden.

Menhaden largely provide the foundation for the marine food chain in New Jersey waters. Due to predator/prey relationships, stocks of fish that the recreational fishing industry depends on such as bluefish, striped bass, summer flounder, and weakfish are dependent upon healthy stocks of menhaden. Since the reduction industry is not allowed to operate in the waters of Delaware, Maryland, or New York, they focus their efforts in our waters. The reduction industry is denying the predatory fish the food that they depend upon.

Menhaden also contribute significantly to the quality of the marine waters. As filter feeders who remove phytoplankton and plant detritus, (Decaying Organic Matter) menhaden help to clean New Jersey?s marine waters through their unique capacity to remove excess nutrients from the water column and rejuvenating our waters. In a study done by marine biologist Sara Gottieg at the University of Maryland, she estimated that for Chesapeake Bay, this ecological function of removing excess nutrients is worth up to $90 million per annum counting only the reduction in nitrogen and not the other nutrient, phosphorous, that algae also contains. Extrapolating from the data above, menhaden are performing as roving sewerage treatment plants, a function worth at least $20 million per annum to New Jersey.

According to data compiled by the New Jersey
Department of Environmental Protection's Bureau of Marine Water Monitoring, Oxygen levels in many of the waters between the barrier islands and mainland have dropped to perilously low levels each summer since 1992. Richard H. Colby, a member of the Park and Environment Advisory Board of Atlantic County and a biology professor at Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, was quoted in the September 10, 2000, edition of the Atlantic City Press last year as saying, ?If oxygen continues to be low, it will decrease the level of animal life in the water, including eels and all the species of marine fish that go through their early-life stages in the brackish waters of the bays and tidal rivers. It has the potential to have a tremendous impact on the fishing industry."

Protected Ospreys too, rely on menhaden as the basis of their diet. Kathleen Clark who is a principal zoologist with the State Division of Fish Game and Wildlife's Endangered Species Program was quoted in the August 17, 2000 edition of The Atlantic City Press as saying, ?a lack of food, particularly menhaden, in the Great Bay area might be the cause of a recent slight decline in osprey offspring in the area. Osprey will eat a variety of fish, but prefer hunting menhaden, and we haven't been seeing a lot of menhaden."

Despite all the benefits that menhaden provide for New Jersey, we are one of the few states that allow The Omega Protein Corporation, headquartered in Houston, Texas with operations based out of Virginia and North Carolina, to remove mass quantities of an extremely valuable resource at the expense of in-state businesses.

Omega Protein Corporation offers no economic benefit to New Jersey. Omega Protein purchases a permit that cost about $110 from the State of New Jersey. Omega Protein pays no taxes in New Jersey, and provides no jobs in New Jersey.

Senator, based on this information, there is clearly no good reason not to vote in favor of S.2252. This Bill is good for the New Jersey marine environment and good for New Jersey?s anglers. Thank you for your time and consideration.

Sincerely,
 
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