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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to buy my first boat this year and being new at this I need some sound advice in the purchase of a boat. I am looking for a boat in the $1,500 range. The purpose is to go out into the bay. I figure that 15' to 19' will do. When viewing a boat, what should I be looking for?

Thank you in advance for your advice.
 

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I second that.

I'm also looking to purchase a used 16'-19' boat for under $6000. Primarily for fishing but also would like family on occasional pleasure cruise.

Thus far i have heard that I should be looking for a center console Boston Whaler type.

Any other things to look for?
Motor brand, HP rating

I find that even used Boston Whalers tend to be on the expensive side even though they are of best quality, are there other to consider?

All info appreciated.
 

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Homework, homework, homework. Know what you're buying!!!

1. Be certain the vessel you're considering is suited for your intended needs. Talk to people that have similar or the same craft and get their input on the pros/cons.

2. Check out the classifieds to find out what the current market is fetching for the boat you're considering. Unless you have a distressed seller, if the boat is way under market value, chances are there is something wrong with it.

3. Do a little research on the engine that comes with the boat. You can find plenty of info on the internet. General wear of engine is usually a function of use and maintanence. If the engine has an hour meter installed, it may provide a basis for evaluating its condition and perhaps need for major repairs.

4. Ask for service records.

5. Depending on the cost of the vessel, hire a a marine surveyor to go through the boat and engine. Although I've owned boats all my life, I wouldn't buy a used vessel until I've had a valuation survey done. There are plenty of things that even an experienced boat owner may overlook. Sometimes, a boat will appear fine on the outside, but underneath it may have severe problems which are costly to fix (rot, delamination, hull defects, etc.)

6. Look for corrosion. If the metal parts on the boat (espcially any metal parts below the waterline) appear to be eating away, it may be a sign that the boat has electrolysis problems that have been ignored for some time.

7. Check for blistering in the hull, softspots (in the deck as well), be certain electrical systems work and that the wiring is proper and in good shape.

8. If the seller is willing, ask to give the boat a sea-trial.

9. Be prepared with questions when you speak with the seller.

10. Have someone with boat experience go along with you to ask questions you may not be aware to ask the seller.

11. Due your due diligence regarding the paperwork on the boat. Ask for a copy of the title, check for tax liens, etc.
 

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when you go look at a boat if it is on land and the owner suggest attaching ear muffs to the motor(ear muffs supply water to the cooling systen so the engine can be run on land)this is not a real judge of what the motor can do.you want to get a sea trial so you can see how the engine performs under a load.ear muffs will not tell you this.when you are out for a sea trial make that tryout as long as you can to see if the boat engine overheats.i'm not a mechanic and i'm sure you will get lots of other advice from experts,the advice only works if you follow it.don't let the seller pressure you because when that engine breaks down or keeps you at the dock it's too late .also with a used or new boat invest in towing insurance .one tow in is more than what the insurance cost.also if this is your first boat get some schooling,the power squadron is a good place to start

vinny f
 
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