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Paint

Both are good when used corectly. I use a powder coat as a base coat for all my other colors. It's even tougher to chip after it has been baked acording to package directions. For example, I'll powder paint with white, bake as directed, then dip the front of the head in pink or green then airbrush silver lines and big red and black eyes. They look great and fish even better. I've even got a few heads that I fished for fluke with last year and all they need is new hair. Thats better than any comercial jig. Have fun!!
Tight Lines
 

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acrylic

I find acrylic model paint to work excellent. it has flex and dosn't chip or crack that much. I also find that just dipping works better then brushing the paint on. Also A new thing I discovered is to make chrome or metal finish I use the new metal paint in the regular spray cans and have chromed my jigs and lure 's with no problem. Unless you are doping bulk then you sent them out. but for just a couple like 100 to 200 ava dimanod jigs spry them its cheap and easy.
 

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Powder Paint

I purched a jar of powder paint from terminal tackle made some smiling bill jig heads and tried to spoon paint on the hot jig, it clumped up and didn't melt evenly, aside from a commercial set up how does the basement jockey apply this type of paint to get smooth results? one guy said to use a torch to even the paint out I found a torch only burns the paint. Help!
 

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powder paint for jig heads

Hi:
I have been using the pro-tec powder paint for jig heads. I found that trying to coat the lures directly from the mold or with a flame did not work either. The solution I found was to get an old toaster oven and set it at 350 degrees. As I make the jig heads I throw them onto the baking pan in the toaster oven. Then I take each one out with a pair of pliers and dip it in the powder and immediately tap off the excess. As I do them I hang them on a small square wire cake rack that I bent into an upside down U. When I have done 10 or so I put the whole rack into the toaster oven and let the paint cure for 20 minutes at the same 350 degrees.

Joseph
Pinguino, Monmouth Beach, NJ
 

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I used to use the vinyl, until I found the powder paints. :) I now use Pro Tec Powder paints.

The proper way to do it is to use a small propane torch to heat up the jig head, dip it in the powder, and bang off the excess. Make sure you don't overheat the jig head (couple seconds, but varies from size to size), and constantly FLUFF up the paint, this is a must!

Goto WalMart and pick yourself up a toaster oven. Sunbeam has a real nice one for $20 and it even comes with a timer. After you paint the jig heads, hang them on some kind of rack (make sure they aren't touching anything), and bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes.

Hope this helps!
johnny
 

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I use the vinyl paint. Once I have a few dozen tied, I put on the sticker eyes. After that I mixx up some 2part rod builders epoxy. Put it on the threads and then coat the whole jig. Dries nice and clear and doesnt chip or crack. Dries nice and thin. Seems like alot of work heating jigs up and stuff like that.


Bill
 

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Jenty is correct.

You should have no problem using a propane torch. The powder should not leave the jar. Hold the jig with vice grips and dip it right into the jar after you've heated it. A quick dip and shake is all that is needed. I don't even bake them and the finish lasts forever.

Another thought about all of those other paints that everyone has mentioned... Are they good for the environment? Do they emit an odor? Will fish sense that they are toxic?
 

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Here is the MFG Instructions

Thought I would add this link.

http://www.csipaint.com/powderpaint.htm

It is the instructions for using the Pro-Tec Powder paint. The instructions are from Component Systems (they make the stuff). Just click on the "Instructions" link in the description.

The key to using powder paints is time and exposure. The absolute best way to do it is with a fluid bed (it's basically a reverse vacuum that keeps the powder fluffy). The Pro-Tec manufacturers also just releases a cheap airbrush for powder paints. It lets you mix different color powders on the same blade.

Another tip that works well is instead of dipping the metals in the powder, sprinkle them over the metal. You can do this using a flower sifter. After you heat the blade, use the sifter for gently sprinkle the powder over the blade. While your sprinkling, blow onto the blade to keep it even.

Hope that helps!

B. Joyce
 

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...oh...one last thing

...almost forgot. The easiest way to heat the jig heads is with an iron. Just keep a hot iron next to your workbench. When you're ready to paint, hold the iron down on the jig head for a few seconds and it will get blistering hot!

Then add your powders.

(Also...check out the "Super Glows" at Component Systems - very cool!)

- B. Joyce
 

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I just hold the piece from the hook with a needle nose pliers over my kitchen stove keeping it rotating for even heating, depending on the size for from 4 to 9 seconds. Dip it in the fluffed powder, swish it, and tap off the excess. After some initial trial and error, it worked great every time. Make sure to have some sort of rack or resting place ready to hang it from while it cools.
 
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