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hi guys hope you can help ,, am looking to buy a new fishing boat, for the long island sound, am looking at the 1802 trophy walk around with cuddy ( with portapotti )) ,, my price range is 25,000 . Does an I/O make that much noise ove I/O,,and would love to hear maybe of other fishing boats your all happy with ,let me hear your inputs.I live in lower westchester so whos the nearest dealer to me .when to the boat show over the weekend, sat with a few dealers working out a ((( deal))) great prices as they said only to get at this boat show ,,so i felt pressured to lock in to there prices with a down payment ,so we left $100 dollars ,which today where getting back ,so please guys help me in finding a good fishing boat in that price range .thats guys happy fishing heres my email [email protected]
 

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Some people prefer IO's some prefer Outboards, most prefer outboards it seems and boats in most cases have higher resale with outboards} .
a quick comparison.
Io's- need more maintence .. greasing the u joints, removing the outdrive every couple years to change umpellas, gimble bearings, bellows and more. There sometimes easier to work on because they are essentally car engine. Theres horsepower lost in those outdrives and theres more things to go wrong theres 2 sets of u joints in these things.
They are smoother and quiter in most cases { the 4 strike outboards are v quiet too}
Closed transoms are a plus, allthough there's a big hole back there in the transom its a sealed transom and it really keeps the following seas out { thats one thing I really liked on my last boat,IO.
Outboards- faster, less maintence, easier to sell{most cases} Outboards are better I think but Straight inboards say turbo diesals those are great and desirable in many sportfishers ect.
alan
another thing I can add if the boat has a Cobra drive made by OMC in the 80's ..dont walk but run away from this headache as fast as you can .
alan
 

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If you have 25,000 to spend on a boat........get a real boat.
18ft is too small.......you can find a GOOD used boat in the 20---25ft range and not spend anywhere near 25,000.

Southwest winds always.....Seaox
 

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Sounds to me like you are being taken advantage of by the dealer at the boat show.

Boat show prices are always available after the show too.

Even then, $25K for a Trophy 1802 is a terrible price. The MSRP for that boat with a Mercury 125, canvas and trailer is just under $22K, you should be able to get it for 15-20% less than that, plus Bayliner also has rebates available now. Check it out for yourself at www.trophyfishing.com.

For a first boat I would recommed you buy something used for around $10,000. Decide if you like boating and then move up to something bigger and/or newer in a year or two. The depreciation on a new Bayliner will scare you away from boating forever!
 

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Do your homework before you buy any boat. An i/o is too much maintenance for a guy just getting into boating. Additionally, you lose a lot of ****pit space with the big box in the stern. Go with an outboard. The other responses are absolutely right on. Less maintenance, less headaches with an outboard.

Why would you go with Trophy Bayliner? What is it about the boat that sells you? Does it look pretty? Does it have nice cushions? Research man, research. I boat a new 21 foot Sea Pro w/a in 2000 and paid a little more than $25,000 with an extended motor warranty and trailer. I chose Sea Pro b/c it had a huge ****pit and loads of fishing features and had a decent cabin.

The snobs out there will say never but a price built boat but they don't know where the money is saved. Sea Pro does not put its money into fancy cushions or heavy duty handles and latches. Yes the flimsy handles break. So what. Fix them and replace them with better handles and latches. Sea Pros have a premium Hi-Flex Plus gelcoat that has a lasting shine. There is also a vinyl-ester barrier coat that protects against blistering. The fiberglass is hand-laid with a 36/10 biaxial that is stronger than 24 ounce woving fibergalss. There are no wood stringers and all hardware is through-bolted into solid backing plates. My boat weighs 2,500 pounds and cruises at 35 kts with a 175 Johnson. Finally, there is a 10 year transferable hull warranty. That's why I chose Sea Pro. Good boat at a decent price. I know it's not a Grady or a Parker, but it does not pretend to be. It serves me well.
 

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I/O or OB? I bought a 22' Wellcraft w/a OB 2 years ago and love it. I got the OB because there is more deck space. The I/O takes up to much fishing space. The 150 Johnson OB pushes the boat at 35kts top speed & 20kts cruising @3000 rpms, wich is plenty for me. I am not looking to win a race, just fish. It is much quiter than the older OB's.

The price of the Wellcraft has come down a couple of g's since I bought mine. Sucks for me.

Take a look at it, good boat in my opinion.
 

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Ditto on 18' being too small for the sound. I have a 23 wellcraft with a 200 Johnson and there is rarely a day that I cant leave the dock. An 18 footer will keep you in the back bays more than you will want. The boat wakes on any given weekend will make you wish you had a bigger boat. 25K on an 18' Bayliner??????
Tight lines, Jim
 

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Stick with outboards if your in Long Island Sound.You can tilt them out of the water when the day is done.You'll be amazed at the algae and barnacle growth that the Sound promotes,most I/O's in this area are high maintenance. I personally have a 24'Grady White Offshore with twin 150hp Johnsons. I feel this is the ultimate boat for the Sound.You can use this boat in the back bays and yet have the power and size to handle the rough elements that the open Sound has to offer further out east.(its like an offshore environment out there)You should be able to find a good used Grady-White at the $25,000 price range.To enjoy the Sound you need a boat in the low to mid 20'range .The Sound is bigger and tougher than most people think. Regards Marco
 

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Suggest you get at least a 22' boat.
An 18' is simply not the way to go for the Sound.
Give some thought to an older good quality resale such as a Grady or Mako or Parker. Definitely go for an outboard. If you can find a clean quality older boat, perhaps its resale price and a new outboard won't break your bank. One last suggestion, you may want to add a 9.9 kicker for trolling and safety.
 

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The only advantage that an I/O has over an O/B is a clean transom rail and dive platform. This only matters if you plan on taking the family boating, then the dive platform is good for the kids. If the boat is only for fishing then get an O/B. Being able to tilt the motor all the way out of the water is a big plus, I have an I/O and keeping the out drive free from growth is almost impossible. I also agree with the other comments on the size of the boat. You can fish the sound in an 18' boat but a bigger boat will give you more room and better handleing on rough days. For 25,000 dollars you can find a great used boat and there are plenty around. Also if you are a first time boat buyer you may want to think about spending that kind of money on a new boat if you are not sure you are going to like it. Like a car a boat will loss a lot of its resale value after you use it.

How ever you go good luck with your choice and be sure to post your fishing reports on this web site come summer.
 

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The only advantage that an I/O has over an O/B is a clean transom rail and dive platform. This only matters if you plan on taking the family boating, then the dive platform is good for the kids. If the boat is only for fishing then get an O/B. Being able to tilt the motor all the way out of the water is a big plus, I have an I/O and keeping the out drive free from growth is almost impossible. I also agree with the other comments on the size of the boat. You can fish the sound in an 18' boat but a bigger boat will give you more room and better handleing on rough days. For 25,000 dollars you can find a great used boat and there are plenty around. Also if you are a first time boat buyer you may want to think about spending that kind of money on a new boat if you are not sure you are going to like it. Like a car a boat will loss a lot of its resale value after you use it.

How ever you go good luck with your choice and be sure to post your fishing reports on this web site come summer.
 

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Another advantage to an I/O is that a full transom is nice to have in a heavy following sea, but my next boat will be an O/B.

A couple of other thoughts:
You will have better weight distribution with an I/O being that the engine is forward and also less torque on your transom without the push/pull of engines hanging out there.

I've been told by people that know a lot more than me about these things that an I/O or inboard will deliver a greater percentage of 'delivered' horsepower than an O/B, but now I'm getting into things that I don't know a lot about.

On the other side of the coin, it would be nice to be able to drop my engine off over the winter to have it worked on. Now I'd have to drop off the whole boat and probably pay storage for the winter because I wouldn't be able to get it back to where I'd usually store it because of the snow.

Anyway, there's more than one pro and con to either choice. Good luck to you, and I hope this helps you out.

shebeen



This message was edited by shebeen on 1-21-02 @ 7:39 PM
 
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