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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Many of the newer saltwater flys that are tied with synthetic materials use a technique called "High Tying". If someone out there can explain how to high tie, I would appreciate it. Thanks in advance for any info.............GHOSTRIDER
 

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GR...The traditional "High-Tie" technique is a rather old tying process that was originally used for bucktails. It dates back to the 1950s and Joe Brooks' Blonde series of hairwing flies. The technique was described in Joe Bate's book, Streamers and Bucktails. When tying the Brooks' bucktails, the High-Tie effect is achieved by tying in a small bundle or bundles of hair on the on the top of the hook shank and then wrapping the tying thread under each bundle to create an upward or "high" angle of about 30 degrees. This allows the hair to splay upward - and in some instances outward - resulting in the the trademark "high" profile. Some of today's tyers have re-discoverd the process and are applying it to the newer wing materials. I would add that the original Brooks Blonde hairwing fly is very effecive for striped bass when feeding on sand eels and small baitfish. It is also a very simple and versatile fly that can be tied in wide range of colors. Hope this helps.
 

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I'd like to add.
Take your material and lay it along the shank of the hook. You want to start your wraps in the back half of the hook shank. Depending on your pattern, hook style, and amount of material you want to use, will determine where you want to start your first wrap.
After laying the material along the hook shank, start your first wrap in the middle of the material. After several wraps, fold the front half of the material over the back half of the material. Now wrap that first fold. The wraps for that first fold should start just infront of your previous wrap. After doing this three to four times it will create a fan type effect, or what's called a high tie.
I have a picture I can post later if it will help. It's on a different computer.
 

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Lattitude describes the more modern variation of the hi-tie. That particular style of tying may be seen at ASWF.org under the fly tying section. Steve Farrar was one of the first to use and popularize that tying variation. In some respects the contemporary hi tie is built off the foudation of a "veil" fly used the "over and back" tie-in of the wing. Tyers like John Haag, Enrico Puglisi and Bob Lindquist did a lot to popularize that style as wel. All of this stuff is connected and has history. If you want to achieve a really dramatic high profile use that version. For a more subtle splay use the Brook's technique.

This post edited by soundflyguy 08:40 AM 01/11/2008
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
First Attempt

Here's a picture of my firat attempt to tie a "Chris' bi polar baitfish" using polar fiber and the high tie method. Not too bad for a first attempt. Will keep at it until they get better. Thanks again to all who answered my inquiry.......GHOSTRIDER
 

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1st pattern is a puglisi style
2nd pattern is the same tie with longer material and without trimming it
3rd pattern I posted so you can see the wraps. If you start further back and wrap tighter to the last wrap you can get the material to lay at a higher angle.

I'll try to find a pic of a peanut bunker pattern I tied using DNA. It shows the higher angle that SFG is talking about.
 

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Lattitude...Very nice touches on your bunker fly...great job! Also, the subtle shaping of the "belly" region of fly #3 is also a nice touch. A lot of folks don't shape and contour their underbellies like that but I prefer that style and feel it gives the fly a more realistic upward looking profile!
 

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AP-

I'm trying to find the fly but there were LMB bucktails tied in the 20's that used high-ties. On top of the shank there were about 10 tie in points and below the shank mirrored the top of the shank except that the bucktail on the bottom was cut to about 1/8", so it looked a bit like a brush. There is also an example of tying a high-tie at Eastern Fly Rodders: http://www.easternflyrodders.com/modules/smartsection/item.php?itemid=34
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Second Attempt

Tried tying the "Bi-Polar Bait Fish" again. It came out better then the first try, but still having trouble getting the flys outline right. Will continue to practice "high Tying". Thanks again to all who answered my post............GHOSTRIDER
 

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MG...you are correct. that form of hairwing goes back even farther to Atlantic Salmon fishing. Remember that tufts of hair and feathers were tied on hooks some 2,000 years ago and who knows how much farther back the technique might go. But in terms of "contemporary" saltwater fly fishing the traditional "high tie" gained its popularity in the 1950 and Bates is generally given credit for giving Brook's design its visibility. If you can get your hands on a copy of Bates' "Bucktails and Streamers, do so because there are a bunch of older streamers and hairwings that can adapted to our forms of fishing. It is really a classic volume. A few years I converted a Black-Nose Dace to what I call a Retro-Dace and it is has turned into one of my best patterns for bass on small eels. But getting back to hairwings, the one significant modificaion of the Blondes were the wraps under the single wing to give it the supward splay. Today some of that same affect is achieved with the doubling back of a lenght of hair over itself and then tying it down.
 

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I know the book. A number of years ago John Kelsey tied a large majority of the Bates flies and posted them on Stripermoon. He also made conversions and one was a large 12 saddle flatwing with a multicolored high tie with the bottom bucktial trimmed. It was a wild looking streamer.
 

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soundflyguy wrote:
Today some of that same affect is achieved with the doubling back of a lenght of hair over itself and then tying it down.

That may be so but I can make the same conical affect by tying the bucktail in as a conventional full collar with a thread bump that will flare the bucktail with thread pressure. Both techniques are old.


This post edited by mgustav 08:58 AM 01/13/2008
 

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This is by John Kelsey. "Mississippi Bug: A Very Interesting Fly

Some time ago, Ken suggested that I look into the Mississippi Bug. It took a while to track it down, and when I did I was rather startled by how the fly looked. It didn?t look like a bug at all! Straight away, I need to credit the sources of information on the fly. Jack, thanks for faxing me the pages on it from the old Herter?s Fly Tying book. I also found that flyanglersonline.com had a great deal of information on the fly, which in turn came from a book called Fly-Tying by William Bayard Sturgis, published by Scribner in 1940. (I am wondering if these books are one and the same, as the illustrations and text are virtually identical. I would love it if someone could clarify this for me.) And Finally, Joseph Bates in his book Streamers and Flies discusses the fly briefly.

I will try to do a brief synopsis of the history and information that I found. A Miss Westwood, a well known tier from Wisconsin, created the original version of the fly. Starting at the bend of the hook, she tied six bunches of bucktail, alternating white and brown to the front of the hook. All the bucktail was tied below the hook, covering the bend and the barb of the hook. This tie caused the fly to ride with the hook inverted in the water. Originally known as Miss Westwood?s Bass Bug, it became known as the Mississippi Bug due to its popularity along the upper reaches of the Mississippi. At some point in the fly?s evolution, it was also known as the Hair Basser, as tied by a Dr. Hoag. Paul Stroud further improved on the fly, calling it the Ozark Bucktail. He is quoted in Bates book as saying that the fly has taken fish ranging from bluegills to tarpon. Stroud produced the fly commercially with an oblique fringe of hair on the back or top of the hook, thus increasing the profile as the tie moved toward the eye of the hook. This is the version of the fly that I have tied.

MISSISSIPPI BUG: One of the original color combinations (Top fly on the image)
Hook: Mustad # 34007, size 1 saltwater
Thread: Pale yellow
Body/Wing: 7 segments of white bucktail, 1 final segment of natural brown bucktail at the eye of the hook.

Stroud always tied this fly in 8 segments. Each segment is tied on in the following manner. Lay a small bunch of bucktail along the length of the hook, with the butt ends facing the back toward the bend of the hook. Take about 12 wraps of thread, keeping the bucktail on the top of the hook. Now, pull the long end of the bucktail that was facing the eye of the hook down and back below the shank of the hook toward the barb. Split the bunch so that half of it passes the shank on one side and half on the other. Now wrap backwards, stopping where your original forward winding began. Tie off with a half hitch. You can now begin the next segment immediately in front of the one you just tied, repeating the process to the front of the hook. Essentially this is a reverse tie, but you are pulling all the bucktail below the shank of the hook.

Having tied up this one, Ken suggested doing some variations using various colors and blends of colors. I also decided to experiment with hooks a bit. The three flies that I tied are in decending order in the image as follows:

CHARTRUESE AND WHITE MISSISSIPPI BUG: (This has only 5 segments)
Hook: Eagle Claw 254, #2
Thread: Pale yellow
Bucktail Segments: From the back of the hook to the front. White, followed by chartreuse, followed by white, followed by chartreuse, and followed by blended purple and turquoise.

RAINBOW MISSISSIPPI BUG: (8 segments)
Hook: Partridge salmon hook, 3/0
Thread: Pale yellow
Tail: White (I added this to cover the top of the bend in the shank of the hook)
Bucktail Segments: From the back of the hook to the front. Two segments of pale yellow orange, followed by medium orange, followed by bright orange, followed by two segments of red, followed by purple, followed by bright yellow.

BLENDED MISSISSIPPI BUG: (8 segments)
Hook: Partridge salmon hook, 3/0
Thread: Pale yellow
Tail: White
Bucktail Segments: From the back of the hook to the front. Pink and pale blue, followed by yellow and yellow orange, followed by pale blue and chartreuse, followed by gray and violet, followed by chartreuse and turquoise, followed by purple, turquoise and a bit of chartreuse, followed by reddish brown and purple, followed by dark blue, dark olive and purple.
Topping: 7 strands of pea**** herl."


The big flies are striper conversions he made.


This post edited by mgustav 09:19 AM 01/13/2008
 

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MG..the thread bump is precisely what I referenced when mentioning tying wraps under the wing. The effect is virtually the same as a "bump". They accomplish the same thing. That is how the original Blonde was tied. I also referenced the Veil fly which, tomy knowlege was one of the first to use the double-back technique. Tyers from LI and NJ was among the first to do so. Actually, Thunder Creek flies were where the conpmeporary technique got recognition. One thing I've come to learn with all is is that really no "first" one to do so! It all is some form of collective sharing!
 
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