NorEast Fishing Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The names Chris, I am new to the boards, going to be gettin my first boat this year. Its a 20 Angler, pretty nice didn't want to go much biger cause i never had a boat, I plan on docking it out in Montauk and get some serious fishing in, i was just wondering if anyone had any good advice for a first time boat owner, thanks.
-New Wave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
You may not want to venture too far out till you feel comfortable with the boat. Respect the ocean. A good compass, Gps and Vhf radio are your best friends. That's my advise. Welcome and good luck!!

FV Moody Blues
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Call the local USCGAUX, to see when the next safe boating course is given. You will learn "A LOT",to get you underway properly. You will also get a discount on insurance with the certificate.

Personally I wish ALL boaters "HAD" to take the course.

What I posted kind-of sums up what the posts from the following mention, the aux. covers all of what they said, and then some!!!



This message was edited by NANSEA11 on 3-10-02 @ 5:27 PM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
If you do not have them you should consider the following items (not ranked in order of importance):

1. Boat fenders
2. GPS
3. VHF radio
4. Compass
5. Life vests for everyone
6. Charts of areas you plan on fishing
7. Fish finder
8. 150' to 200' of anchor line unless you are planning to only anchor in 10' or less of water
9. Boat pole with hook (good for fending off and holding on to the dock)

If you have never piloted a boat before you should consider taking a course before you take your boat out. At the very least you should bring a friend who has experience. I also recommend the book "Chapman Piloting Seamanship & Small Boat Handling" This book has lots of usefull information.

Good Luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,522 Posts
Good luck with the new toy. I agree with the prior post and take a saftey cours to learn the rules and regs. Where in Montauk are you keeping the boat. The first thing you should get is a good local chart and study your water depths. I would recomend also that you go to your local marine store and get NAUTICAL CHART #1. It is book that will give you a list of what all the symbols are that you will see on a chart.The book is about $10. The book may seem a little overwehlming at first but as time goes on and you use your chart more and more the book will come in handy.
You should get a Goast Guard Package from the dealer with the purchase of a new boat. Everything from above and include a flair kit. The package from the dealer should include, 4 life jackets, flares, anchor w/ 150ft of line, a throw floation or ring with 25 ft of line, fire extingusher, whistle. Some dealers will give you 4 dock lines,2 fenders, etc. Your electronics will be at your own expence. Being that you have a 20ft boat you might consider a hand held GPS, a decent VHF and a F/F depth recorder.
Welcome to the club.

BCMeyer



This message was edited by bcmeyer on 3-10-02 @ 6:25 PM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Salawag,
Are you crazy? A Steel prop for a first time boat owner is a better idea because of the high risk of running a ground or getting too close to a sand bar. The Steel prop will be much harder to damage(aluminum props bend like pretzles when u hit the bottom).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,480 Posts
I am crazy but that's besides the point.
Better to go through 2 $ 50.00 aluminum props then 1 $1900.00 gearcase + labor & layup time. Thats the point of using the aluminum prop, wreck it not the lower unit sort of financial damage control , I stand by my advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,732 Posts
Hi,

I would make a check list for launching from the trailer, getting underway, and putting it back on the trailer. If your keeping it at a slip, then one for dock and one for the trailer. I bet everyone on this post left the plug out when launching or forgot to untie the straps at the transom when launching.

Once you get into a routine, you won't need this.

I am sure we can provide some things for the list like:

1. Boat plug in when launching
2. Straps off
3. Oil full or mixed right.
4. Battery ok.
5. No water in water filter.
6. Lifejackets for everyone.
7. Flares not expired.
8. Drinking water onboard.
9. Toilet paper
10. Sunglasses (a must!)
11. Sunscreen (no tanning stuff, you will broil)
12. Enough gas in the take and pleanty extra.
13. Marine Weather and tides checked.
ETC.

Capt. Marc
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,056 Posts
Just a word to the wise. I had a smaller boat in
Montauk for over ten seasons and you may want to
consider uping the length of your anchor line. You
may want to chunk bass in up to 40'or fish
Frisbees for Sea Bass and Anchor in 60'-75'.
Codfishing you obviously would need even more.
Taking into accounts the speed of the current in
and around Montauk I would suggest you need at
least 300' of line to properly hold. Anchor rode
depth x 3 would be over your 150'. For safety sake
should your engine die in deeper water the extra
line would assure you stay in position for
assistance. Have fun, the fishings fantastic
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Scalawag,
The whole point of getting a STEEL prop instead of an aluminum one is that the Steel prop will not bend or "break." Better to pay for one steel prop, that by the way doesn't cost nearly as much as that (oh yeah I'm an outboard mechanic), then have to waste the time and get your aluminum prop fixed over and over.



This message was edited by Capt J on 3-12-02 @ 6:51 PM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,581 Posts
I have the understanding that a steel prop will add about 5MPH at the same engine RPM's. They are also stonger, and therefore won't get damaged as easily when you go aground. However, I have also been told by more than one mechanic that if you do run aground, because of a steel props strengh, it will not bend, but that something has to give, usually the gears in the lower unit. It is certainly a lot more expensive to replace the gears in the lower unit that a prop. It makes sense to me. Is that indeed true?

Good Luck and Tight Lines
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
Chris,
You have gotten some very good advice here. Regarding the alum vs. steel prop debate, I have another solution - just don't run aground. Many captains go their entire boating life without hitting something.
Get good charts, learn to read bouys and follow them and the rules. If you don't take navigation seriously, you will hit something eventually. Proceed with extreme care in areas that you haven't visited at least 20 times, and even then be wary. Montauk is less troublesome than many parts of the Sound, but don't let your guard down. You won't draw much in the Angler so you'll have to really be in the wrong place to hit something.
Watch the weather like a hawk and the tide, and let the passengers drink the beer until you're tied up for the day. Remember, things can go wrong in an instant so stay on your toes and you'll be fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,480 Posts
Ok guys this is the deal.
A Stainless Steel prop is faster, will take many shots without chipping or bending and is a " no Brainer" for offshore use or someone who has experience in a given area.
For someone just starting out { the thread is " First Boat"}, learning the bouys, waterways & tides the aluminum is the way to go for the first couple years. 95% of the time you'll hit something with a SS prop without damage but that 5 % of hitting bottom is a rock, hunk of steel , or cement ect. and it TAKES OUT THE LOWER UNIT. It happened to me in Renoylds channel over by that ramp just west of long beach rd. Jan. day in the sleet, I was doing a tow job , pushing a guy's bayliner into the ramp, got close to the bulkhead juiced it into a block of cement.
If this guy's boating N.Shore LI , I double my reccommendation.
Capt. J , Your an outboard mechanic and dont get this? Ive been working on these engines for yrs. Part of a marina family, every year someone comes in with a L. unit wiped out by hitting a hard object with a ss prop.WHERE DO YOU WORK? WhatMARINA?
The idea is it's cheap insureance for a couple yrs. till he makes all the mistakes.
I dont even know why I'm repeating this?
SS props way to go once you learn the boat/waters/tides ect to recap..
later, Alan




This message was edited by Scalawag on 3-13-02 @ 11:20 AM
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top