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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Like most here I have many rigs I spooled a new spheros
spinner with 30lb P-line on a ten foot rod and found
new waters of the beach wow great casting. Less weeds
less wieght all good things bad things were knot slipped
wow that rig went a mile, O S#it thats deep I'm not getten
stiches cut next cast with the middle finger WOW cut that one too
live and learn.
I used the skippers pole fluken last year first time with briad on a bottem drift great feel hole new world not even fare.
So I like braid but I'm not married to it so how bout that fireline
that is something different small dia. then mono ext...
and is dacron worth a look? I've got to spool a Penn 209 & 309
and my new Avet mxl I'm just looking for some thoughs form
users of the diff. lines.
 

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Well, O.K.

Fireline is built somewhat differently than a braid. Insted of many time Spectra fibers being woven together on a type of loom, as a braid would be, Fireline's microfibers are fused together, sort of melted into a single thicker line. That's the big difference between FL and just about all braids.

A perusal of our surf board as well as some other sites that specifically target surfcasting will reveal that FireLine is VERY popular for that application.

While it is initially kinda stiff, it does "break in" fairly quickly and tends to "wind knot" and finger cut much less often that a true braid.

Its quite a bit thicker though, not as much as mono, but a good braid is MUCH thinner at any given pound test than Fireline. This would cut back a squinch on overall casting distance and in a boat application, might be cause to use a slightly heavier sinker than a thinnner braid would call for. usually not a real biggie, unless you're fishing somewhere that has some major current flow.

There are quite a few here on this board that use Fireline for boat fishing as well. It is pretty much as sensitive as braid, seems to be more abrasion resistant, and handles well on a revolving spool reel.

I personally do not use it, but then, I don't surf cast.

Check out the new Stren version of Fireline - its also relatively clear and called "Microfuse." You can see it HERE.

Since Stren and Berkeley, the original maker of Fireline are both owned by the Pure Fishing Group, I suppose its only to be expected that some of their similar technologies would sort of cross pollinate.

best, Lep

This post edited by Leprechaun 09:51 AM 02/09/2008
 

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I'm a power pro fan, but it sounds like alot of surf guys don't like it as much. spider wire is another popular pick.

Hey lep,

When spectra first got popular everyone was picking PP over fireline because there was talk of fireline cutting guides. Did they fix that problem or was it just a myth? :confused:
 

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Hi 6to8, yes its a myth.

Fireline is no more abrasive than any other line. In fact it should be LESS abrasive than a typical braid, though guide wear with any superline is actually less than it would be with mono - due to Spectra's lower co-efficient of friction.

Now where did that myth of superline guide cutting originally come from? Two places. First - the very first generation of braided lines included a few versions made not of spectra, but of Kevlar. Now that stuff WAS very abrasive -- thought it didn't much bother even lower-end Aluminum Oxide guides, it was death on chrome-plated steel ones.

Since the general fishing public was not super knowledgeable at that point in time as to the differences between the various braid raw materials, all the braids picked up the reputation of being guide-eaters. Not very fair to the very guide-friendly Spectra (and the Micro-Dyneema Euro version), but that's what happened.

Additionally, and this is reason number two, the earliest Spectra braids were very loosely woven. The relatively large spaces between the braid fibers tended to pick up microscopic particles of very abrasive silica sand, especially when used in surfcasting and dirty-water applications. Needless to say, even ceramic guides will get hurt after a while under these circumstances.

Once this shortcoming was better understood by the line manufacturers, they came up with tighter weaves for their lines - adjusted to the situation, as it were. And though this greatly helped with the abrasion problem, the possibility still does exist that guide life can be shortened when braid is used under certain conditions.

I haven't personally seen it - because I do not surfcast or fish under the type of conditions conducive to this problem, but it still is a distinct, if somewhat remote possibility.

best, Lep
 

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Fireline is thicker as it's very underrated. It's 30# test is comparable to Power Pro or Tuff Line XP's 50/60# test.

I have varying #test on spinning and conventional reels. Love it for throwing light bucktails for fluke to drowning a crab for tog.
 

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I do like using braid for blackfish and fluke like fishing where feel and quick hook setting are very important, and I am also a big fan of anything that allows me to go lighter/smaller in terms of gear/tackle, and braid is good for that. Good for casting distance as well.

However I have yet to be "won" over by the braid craze.

I just have had so many tangles and issues with that braid knotting up in the reel or looping itself around something right before I cast, maybe its more user error than I would like to think. It seems to fade out and get worn somewhat quickly as well, and in general have lately been feeling that it is more trouble than its worth. Lots of headaches...That braid just has it out for me. Maybe I should try new-er variation like the daiwa?

Tried spider wire, loved it at first, not very durable, and proably wouldnt use it again.....especially for the price

Used firewire once or twice along time ago, and did notice imporoved casting distances, and sensitivity, but this line (along with the spider wire) spoiled on me rather quickly. Myabe its just needs to be replaced more frequently than I thought.....

Now im back to the old fashioned mono. And im McLovin it. It was like coming home again after a long hard journey....

This post edited by TakinONwater 09:56 AM 02/14/2008
 

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Fireline starts out very stiff and wirey. "Breaks in" rather quick and after repeated use it does appear to get faded and sometimes even a little "fuzzy" Never had a problem with it weakening at all. Had one reel that was used heavily for 3 years and then I finally reversed the line and it's still going strong.
 
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