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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was walking down Woodmont Beach (Milford, CT) the other day for a leisurly stroll when I ran across a "fresh" dead Striper on the beach (approx. 26 inches). It had no apparent wounds, nor did it have any damage around the mouth area caused by a fishing lure or hook.

I found this interesting because you don't see Stripers along Woodmont Beach during the wintertime. The water temps are usually very cold, which kills our fishing season in mid December.

What do you think? Do you think that the record warmth we experienced affected the migration patterns of the Stiper? What do you think this means for this spring.

I got so curious I ventured out last night to the jetty at Woodmont. The waves were crashing, the water brown, and the wind was howling. Perfect Striper fishing :) After about an hour, I hooked on....to something. It was a fish no doubt, but lost it half way in. Five minutes later, I was crushed by a rolling wave, soaking me from head to toe (No, I was not dressed properly). Now it's killing me to know what it could have been (Striper, Flounder).

Any thoughts....

Soundfisher
 

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Huskers23 wrote:
I was walking down Woodmont Beach (Milford, CT) the other day for a leisurly stroll when I ran across a "fresh" dead Striper on the beach (approx. 26 inches). It had no apparent wounds, nor did it have any damage around the mouth area caused by a fishing lure or hook. ? What do you think? Do you think that the record warmth we experienced affected the migration patterns of the Stiper? What do you think this means for this spring.

? Now it's killing me to know what it could have been (Striper, Flounder). Any thoughts....


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Soundfisher,

Indeed, we are having record breaking weather AND there are still fish in our waters. In fact, the water is warm enough and I am still getting bass reports from NJ waters and along our NY coast.

I also know that there are fish reports from the outflows of CT and LI (North shore/ Sound)?and that?s where that bass (gut hooked) probably came from.

What do I think about this spring? It probably means that the fish will be migrating earlier!

As far as what kind of fish that got away? We?ll if you were using lure or fish chunks? it?s probably a bass? but if you were using worm or clams? it could be either a bass, white perch or flounder. ;)

"Crazy" Alberto
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Crazy:

I used ribbon worms I dug up from the harbor. I'm not really sure what kind of fish it could have been considering it wasn't the strongest run I've had. But then again, the bass that I've caught in the rivers this winter have generally fought like wet rags. God only knows!

As for the spring migration...well, I think we might be in for an earlier season. If so, I'm so **** pumped because I'm going stir crazy. That's why I stood on a jetti last night getting pounded by waves in the month of February.

One suggestion:

Though you primarily fish the NY & NJ coasts, I think it would be benefitial if you keep us reported on Striped Bass that are being caught in the sound. I'm not necessarily talking about the rivers/estruaries or waters near powerplants, but the actual sound. This would serve as a barometer regarding fish migration and whether this Striper season will start earlier than years past. Just a suggestion. Thanks for you input. Keep up the good work.

Soundfisher
 

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Huskers23 wrote:

I used ribbon worms I dug up from the harbor. I'm not really sure what kind of fish it could have been considering it wasn't the strongest run I've had. But then again, the bass that I've caught in the rivers this winter have generally fought like wet rags. God only knows!

? One suggestion:

Though you primarily fish the NY & NJ coasts, I think it would be benefitial if you keep us reported on Striped Bass that are being caught in the sound?..

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Hello Soundfisher,
To be perfectly honest with ya? Although I live on Long Island, I travel great distances to catch just about anything! One day you might find me prowling the freshwater ponds for crappies, Ice fishing the Canadian waters, fly fishing for trout or stripers, powercasting and surfcasting the Montauk and North beaches, chasing tuna or marlin on a exotic island of Nicaragua or South America?. You?ll never know. :)

If you are looking for Northshore / Sound reports, all you need to do is ask! I prowl that area a lot during the winter and spring? and I get constant reports on what?s going on?.

Now? regarding the ribbon worms. If that?s what you were using? the ribbon worm is great bait for stripers, flounder, white perch, blackfish and tommy cod! When using ribbon worms... Make sure to set the hook fast otherwise you will run into gut hooked fish.

Also? the reason why the bass are fighting like a ?wet rag?? is because the water is still cold and the fish are lethargic.

"Crazy" Alberto
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Crazy:

Thanks so much for your feedback and willingness to share reports/info for my neck of the woods.

As for the bait, I was using ribbon worms. I've had some guys call them all sorts of things (most notably a tape worm), but that is incorrect. From what I understand, tape worms are parasidic, whereas ribbon worms aren't. Am I correct in saying this?

As for gut hooking fish with ribbon worms, well, I learned the hard way when I started using them last fall. You are SO CORRECT regarding setting the hook quickly.

Thanks again,

Soundfisher
 
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