NorEast Fishing Forum banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
512 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was on a party boat fishing 17 fanthoms last week.During the day a couple of keeper cod were caught.When these fish were filleted at days end there were parasitic white coiled worms in the meat. The captain said they were harmless and would of course die while the fillets were cooked.He did take the worms out of the fillets.He also said summer caught cod are loaded with these worms.
How are these worms getting into the cod`s body?Is it something the cod are eating?:rolleyes:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,923 Posts
They enter behind the scales, and bore through the skin. You'll notice that they are removed by skinning the fish and searching for them from the skin side. They add a bit of crunch to an otherwise boring meal.

Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,334 Posts
Don't want to spark a debate but ...this is why you should never eat raw fish (sushi). Many parasites cannot be seen with the naked eye. And many restaurants even fancy expensive ones lack proper hygiene. Better to cook the fish and eat the worms that are dead
:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,314 Posts
One theory!!

Charge #2. Seals are damaging cod stocks by spreading the ?cod worm? (Pseudoterranova decipiens, also sometimes called the ?sealworm?).

The presence of the cod worm devalues cod fillets in the marketplace, but what role does this organism play in nature? The known facts include these:

- Cod worm has a complex life cycle, involving the development of larval stages in a series of cold-blooded hosts, including cod, with the adult stage ultimately living and reproducing in the guts of seals, especially the grey seal. Worm eggs are shed into the water via seal feces. (Illustration below, right, reproduced from Bonner's "The Natural History of Seals" - click on image to enlarge.)

- According to Bonner, cod worms (and other similar species) are ?universal in the pinnipeds? (seals) and apparently do not cause the animals any significant harm. Bonner reports seeing ?grey seals in excellent condition and with ample blubber reserves whose stomachs contained more than two litres of large nematodes.? (Bonner, 1990, p 133)

- In the cod, the larvae encyst in the muscles, where they remain dormant until the fish is eaten by the final host, the seal. This does not appear to place any great stress on the cod. In the warm stomach of the seal the larvae emerge from the cysts, finally mature and produce eggs.

- ?The mature worms produce huge quantities of eggs which are shed into the water in the feces of the seal and hatch within 10-60 days, depending on water temperature.? (Bonner, 1990)

This scenario, of vast numbers of invertebrate eggs being regularly released into the ocean by seals?is this essentially a positive or a negative thing?

Beyond Bonner?s statement that the mature worms ?produce huge quantities of eggs,? I cannot see where the reproductive output of the cod worm has been quantified. But it may be considerable. Many mature marine invertebrates divert significant energy and nutrient resources to spawn production. (Molluscs, for example, commonly have ?gonadosomatic indices? in excess of 100%, meaning that the weight of eggs produced exceeds the weight of the animal itself. Incidentally, this index is much lower in fish species.)

In the stable, warm, nutrient-rich environment of the seal?s stomach, the reproductive output of the cod worm may well be far higher than that of similar non-parasitic worms. Exempt from the common requirements of searching for food and defending oneself against predation, this organism seems to have little to do besides produce eggs. The marine worm species that have evolved to take advantage of the guts of marine mammals may therefore play a greater ecological role than others in the replenishment of the zooplankton by spawn production.

Elsewhere I have argued that all spawn-producing marine species, fish and invertebrates, contribute to zooplankton maintenance in this way, because their pelagic eggs and larvae ARE zooplankton, and they also provide food for major zooplankton species such as copepods. The vast majority of the eggs produced are consumed as food by these tiny organisms. In this way, all these spawn producers contribute to the enhancement of marine production. It now becomes evident that marine mammals such as seals also perform this ecological service, making direct contributions to zooplankton maintenance by hosting marine worms and shedding their live spawn into the water. In today?s precarious situation of declining abundance of marine zooplankton, this steady output of worm eggs may represent an especially valuable ecological contribution.

This post edited by AUDREYMAE 07:11 PM 01/10/2008
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
601 Posts
Fishing Friend wrote:
Don't want to spark a debate but ...this is why you should never eat raw fish (sushi). Many parasites cannot be seen with the naked eye. And many restaurants even fancy expensive ones lack proper hygiene. Better to cook the fish and eat the worms that are dead
:)
well - while it might bother you mentally, so much sushi is consumed without incidence that by and large I'd consider it safe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
This used to be a regular problem years ago with Mahi.. they had a lot of worms in them.. i have not seen this problem in the past several years but about 5 yrs ago i notices that it was there and now slowly decreased.. do not know if anyone else experiences this but isure saw it.. Even in the bigger fish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,650 Posts
bretabaker wrote:
Fishing Friend wrote:
Don't want to spark a debate but ...this is why you should never eat raw fish (sushi). Many parasites cannot be seen with the naked eye. And many restaurants even fancy expensive ones lack proper hygiene. Better to cook the fish and eat the worms that are dead
:)
well - while it might bother you mentally, so much sushi is consumed without incidence that by and large I'd consider it safe.
id be willing to bet that more people get sick from frozen hamburger than raw fish
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,363 Posts
I've got another species with worms...

Some swordfish I bought back in August had worms. That was a first...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
871 Posts
bonsiguy wrote:
boloranks wrote:
wow how can one eats a fish with worms
fork and knife with a side of tartar sauce


Tarter sauce compromises the exquisite taste of fresh fish.

All you need is a touch of lemon and butter.

AND a bottle of nice white wine :)

Come to think of it, a nice blonde to also enjoy the meal with you would make for an interesting evening eh?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,343 Posts
Ive never found orms in anything other than cod but I must admit I dont really look. Uness the cod is really infested I hjsut cook em up. LOL I remembe my friend's wifr found a curled up worm on her plate and I told her one of the veins msut hae stuck to the fillet when I threw it in the pan lol. She bought it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
I have found that by leaving the worms in the fillet right up until you are ready to cook them helps. When the neighbors all want some of your fillets, just make sure you point out the worms and remind them that they really need to remove them, and 9 out of 10 times, they will walk away empty handed.

Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,246 Posts
cusk get the worms really bad..don't know why..I caught one last summer bet you it had 20-30 worms in each fillet....that was a little too much...never saw them in pollack/haddock/hake/wolffish, but cod and cusk are prone to them, especially in the summer.

Does it depend on how docile a fish is? For example pollack swim off the bottom, cusk hang out right on the bottom...just a thought.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,131 Posts
I have had a 1/2 doz fluke with the identicle "curly worm" that I pull out of cod in the past 3 years. They tend to be a bit more pink in the fluke. I was more concerned about location thinking it may have been isolated to the location in J-bay. Then I caught fish in East Rockaway with them.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top