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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The codfish landings off the coast of Mass. is to say the least very encouraging. Talked to Mike Leary "SEABAT" as he's known/ One of the best and more knowledgable netters in the area. The gillnetters have been getting their 800lbs a day in 2 nets and the draggers have been basically hitting bottom and hauling right back up with their limit. No driving in circles for hours the last 4 weeks. So basically hitting the bottom and hauling back getting their 800 along with their yellowtail flounderlimit. Before you all panic theirs not alot of boats left with days at sea and the cod have now mostly moved into the conservation zone were they can't be touched. These fish are mostly 24 to 28 inch fish from that 2003 class. They say this body of codfish is 12 miles by 6 miles and has not been seen in this cocentration in many many years. So this is very encouraging for the future.
 

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AUDREYMAE wrote:
The codfish landings off the coast of Mass. is to say the least very encouraging. Talked to Mike Leary "SEABAT" as he's known/ One of the best and more knowledgable netters in the area. The gillnetters have been getting their 800lbs a day in 2 nets and the draggers have been basically hitting bottom and hauling right back up with their limit. No driving in circles for hours the last 4 weeks. So basically hitting the bottom and hauling back getting their 800 along with their yellowtail flounderlimit. Before you all panic theirs not alot of boats left with days at sea and the cod have now mostly moved into the conservation zone were they can't be touched. These fish are mostly 24 to 28 inch fish from that 2003 class. They say this body of codfish is 12 miles by 6 miles and has not been seen in this cocentration in many many years. So this is very encouraging for the future.

Thanks for the info, have been out twice this mo. (jan) out of cape anne and have seen the gns and draggers myself. Can 't fault anyone with trying to make a living. Not too happy with the way the regs. are set-up. Any specifics on the conservation zone ? Have never fished with you but looking forward to changing that this spring.

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Fishing pressure!

The commercial fleet in New England is a third of what it was in the late 80's. Also back then they could fish 365 days a year in any area they'd like. Today they've been cut to 88 days maximum and shut out from areas for months at a time. You talk about the breeders caught between Cape Ann and the Isles of Shoals for 2 weeks in May.. Not that big of a deal considering that: In the late 80's early 90's From April thru June there was 200 boats dragging day and night non stop with no limit on cod, landing thousands per boat and unloading and turning around to go right back at it. Today those boats can't fish till July 1st at which time the spawning is over and the fish moved on. I'm not talking 10 to 20 thousand lbs landed by rod and reel for the spawning time in spring but millions of lbs were taken out of there yearly and you wondered how those fish kept coming back year after year. The 2003 class has spawned a couple times already which shows that the plan is working. Now we just have to open dogging back up to help the recovery further. You are also seeing large amounts of short cod being caught up and down the coast as far as Jersey. It all points to a brighter future for the cod in my opinion.
 

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AUDREYMAE wrote:
They say this body of codfish is 12 miles by 6 miles and has not been seen in this cocentration in many many years. So this is very encouraging for the future.

Lets hope this is good. History shows that it may not be. in 1992 cod fishing off of Newfoundland was band because populations were so low. In 1997 it was reopened on a limited basis because sampling found aggregations of cod larger than any seen even years before the closure. It was assumed that this meant an increase in breeding and was the beginning of a comeback. Sampling in 1998 failed to find almost any cod and the closure was reinstated and is still closed. Why the cod have not been able to make a comeback is unknown.
 

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Like the dumping grounds in Boston, the inshore area should be closed to all fishermen during the spawning months, let the fish do their thing. That spring slaughter is not only bad for the fish, but bad for the image of the recreational angler, and eventually we'll pay the price.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Mc Clooney

Definately understand your view on this matter. I certainly don't think it was a slaughter last year. You saw the pictures of bigfish but 99 percent of the time the boats went home with 25 fish a boat in there and only a third were breeders the rest haddock and male cod. But the year before was definately a slaughter. You have a very Valid point and understand your view. I myself won't eat a cod that big. Give me a nice 24 inch cod fried to perfection,,better yet haddock.

This post edited by AUDREYMAE 10:34 AM 01/31/2008
 

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mclooney wrote:
Like the dumping grounds in Boston, the inshore area should be closed to all fishermen during the spawning months, let the fish do their thing. That spring slaughter is not only bad for the fish, but bad for the image of the recreational angler, and eventually we'll pay the price.

You make it sound like those steakers just jump on everyone's hooks. The reality of fishing that particular area with hook and line is very far from what I'd call a "slaughter".
 

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Slaughter may be extreme, but my point is, the head boats fish the mud to put a few slobs on the deck, and doesn't everyone want a shot at a 50 lb cod? We need those fish to stay in the mud so that we will have a class of 2007, 2008...How many fish over 40 pounds were taken out of the GOM this year? verses 2006, 2005....I bet you get the fishing records from the party boats, you'll see a steady, if not sharp decline in larger fish. Recs dont haul them out like a dragger, but we need to do our part to protect the resource, otherwise the only thing fisheries will let us catch is the ever popular cusk.
 

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AUDREYMAE wrote:
The commercial fleet in New England is a third of what it was in the late 80's. Also back then they could fish 365 days a year in any area they'd like. Today they've been cut to 88 days maximum and shut out from areas for months at a time. You talk about the breeders caught between Cape Ann and the Isles of Shoals for 2 weeks in May.. Not that big of a deal considering that: In the late 80's early 90's From April thru June there was 200 boats dragging day and night non stop with no limit on cod, landing thousands per boat and unloading and turning around to go right back at it. Today those boats can't fish till July 1st at which time the spawning is over and the fish moved on. I'm not talking 10 to 20 thousand lbs landed by rod and reel for the spawning time in spring but millions of lbs were taken out of there yearly and you wondered how those fish kept coming back year after year. The 2003 class has spawned a couple times already which shows that the plan is working. Now we just have to open dogging back up to help the recovery further. You are also seeing large amounts of short cod being caught up and down the coast as far as Jersey. It all points to a brighter future for the cod in my opinion.

You wondered how those fish kept coming back year after year ?

Same thing on Georges in the 70s boats bringing in 60,000 + lbs every two days and back out again . It amazed me back then that there could be that many fish ! We have been paying for the greed for awhile now . I hope you 're correct about the future being brighter.
 
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