NorEast Fishing Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In Hawaii we rarely see Longfin Tuna (Tomboshibi)during the day and most are caught at night. I plan to jig for them at night and they average in the 60-70lb range. My question is whats the standard jigs that you East Coast anglers normally catch them on and do you catch them during the day or night? Also, are they like Blackfins that there's so many they become humbug when targeting Ahi?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,349 Posts
Maloy wrote:
In Hawaii we rarely see Longfin Tuna (Tomboshibi)during the day and most are caught at night. I plan to jig for them at night and they average in the 60-70lb range. My question is whats the standard jigs that you East Coast anglers normally catch them on and do you catch them during the day or night? Also, are they like Blackfins that there's so many they become humbug when targeting Ahi? Our longfin on the East Coast are also in 40 - 70 lbs range. Whether they bite daytime or night time depends on weather temperature here. Chunking yellowfin or longfin usually starts in Auguset and we catch them mostly at night. When water temperature drops under about 63 degree in early October, bites are shifted to daytime bites. However we have success to land them on jigs daytime in summer when they normally don't bites on baits.

Tuna jig fishermen here always like to catch albacore as well as yellowfin. For the same size, I feel albacore fights better than yellowfin.

We use same jigs for albacore as we use for yellowfin. The most popular jigs for tuna here is short jigs(6-8 inches) in 6 - 10 oz range though longjigs also work.
Jigs such as diamond/hammered diamond jigs, metallic sardine jigs, Sevenseas Hooker jigs or Shimano Butterfly's short jigs are proven jigs for yellowfin or longfin.
Some jig fishermen like to use glow jigs for tuna at night and I observe it doesn't make much difference whether you use glow jigs or non-glow jigs at night.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
687 Posts
60-70 lb. albies in the northeast where I do most of my tuna fishing is considered a very large albie. Have jigged them up that size over the yrs. but not too often. Most of mine have been 30-50 lbs. 10 yrs. ago use to have huge schools of them in the canyons around here but I have noticed a decline in the amt. of lft comparatively. Can remember being in the Dip and tails when there must have been thousands in that particular area. We would be trolling and as soon as there was a knock-down I would throw a jig and hook up. Nailed as many as 1/2 doz. albies that way on one trip. Most of my best night bites jigging for albies have occured 2am to daybreak. Don 't know if it means anything ? As for jig types have caught them on everything including ava bluefish jigs 3-6oz. They were only $3.00 yrs. ago. I beleive if it has flash and flutter it will work well as long as they are coming thru.
Have nailed them during the day 40-100 ft. and at night 80-180 ft. Most of them caught on the night bite were between 80-120 ft. These are just my experiences over the last 30-yrs. of catching lft. If you hook into a 70 lb. albie you 're likely in for a good battle. They are strong and super-fast. I always use fluoro leader 40-50 lb. and have gone down to 30 on occaision. Seems like it helps especially during the day . Use to fish the raider jigs ( original co.) and did well on them. They were $6.00 back then and I still have a few left.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
509 Posts
it depends

Maloy wrote:
Also, are they like Blackfins that there's so many they become humbug when targeting Ahi?

rare is the day when they become as thick as the blackfin, but we can hope!

some people don't like lft because of a belief that the meat is of lower quality. this is a 'less filling - tastes great' argument. of course it tastes great- better than yft imho. (made some nice hand rolls this weekend!)

as for the jigs, i would also add the crippled herring (7oz) and luhr jensen deep stinger (10oz) to the list. i have heard that lighter leader (50lbs) helps, but have not seen conclusive evidence. little viking jigs can be lethal.

in general, fishing with the lightest (possible for the conditions)silvery jig in your bag is a good starting place. it also pays to experiment with depths as we jig them at depths greater than is typical for yft. it is not uncommon to pluck a fish from 300+ down.

good luck and let us know how you make out- especially if you find them as thick as blackfin!

This post edited by dhoperos 10:33 AM 01/07/2008
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,349 Posts
longfin jigging can be hot and furious in late season when water temperature cools down.
Here is a picture of nice longfin and yft catch, mostly on jigs. We saw many big albacore in 50 -70 lbs range in 2006.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
Hey Kil.....

Do you go to the gym or do you just work out with fish?!?! hahaha

I want to bring you to the canyon this year and see what kind of jigging we can do!!

I am going to cabo in a month for 10 days for my honeymoon changed it from hawaii and i want to try poppin' a striped marlin!!! wish me LUCK!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,458 Posts
Hey Kil,

I hooked up to two good sized fish, one during the day on an offshore buoy, and one at night. Both times, I was foiled. On the first fish the hook pulled about 30 feet below the surface, and on the second fish the assist hook broke (I was using those stupid gamakatsu hooks...silly me...). But they are definitely there, as are tons of "shibis" (little 5-15lb yellowfins), which can be a nuisance...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,349 Posts
Sportfishingusa wrote:
Do you go to the gym or do you just work out with fish?!?! hahaha

I want to bring you to the canyon this year and see what kind of jigging we can do!!

I am going to cabo in a month for 10 days for my honeymoon changed it from hawaii and i want to try poppin' a striped marlin!!! wish me LUCK!Fishing boats are my gym. :)
Good luck on your Cabo trip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,458 Posts
Kenton vented this one of any semblance of life. Note the head region...the fear was that the fish tail-slapping the deck would scare the others away, so it was mercilessly dispatched with a fish billy, earning it the nickname "smash-head."


...can you tell that I have two essays due this week?;)
 

Attachments

1 - 16 of 16 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top