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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Thanks again for all the info--this is great!! There are too many of you to thank individually, so please don't take this group thank you the wrong way. If I were to do it otherwise, I'd hit that 1000-post milestone pretty quick.

Now can any of you offer advice on how to convince my wife that it is OK to buy a boat?? lol
 

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I'll get bashed but here goes

There is a lot of advice here, most of it bad.
If your taking a family out you want at least a 25 footer. Something left out, where are you boating? North Shore in the sound and eastern GSB and ocean travel requires a decent hull under you. On most days in Patchogue Bay, where I live, a 19-20 foot boat will make you wish you never bought it in the first place! The afternoon southwest wind will eat you alive! Same for Northwest/north in the Sound. To even think about ocean fishing, even on a calm day you need a 23, at least. It may be flat outside but the inlets can turn nasty in a flash! No place for smaller boats. A thirty footer is a small boat, period. Go for it, you will learn quick and won't end up constantly trading up to get what you really want. I find they are easier to handle than a small single engine craft. BUT, they will cause more "crunch damage". The capt. to show you the ropes is a great way to go. Many manufacturers offer this program for free now.
Buy the proper insurance, liability and hull insurance.
Good Luck.
PM me if you have any other questions.
Rob
 

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Get Bashed....deservedly

You know, it really steams me when somebody comes along and criticizes everybody else because they see things differently.

Whatever your opinion Makobob, you are far outweighed by members with the opposite opinion. Regardless, you are way out of line with your:

quote:

There is a lot of advice here, most of it bad.

statement. What you are offering is your OPINION as are the rest of us. Rather than insist you are right and everybody else is wrong, you might have tried to be a little less arrogant.

and I think I have to disagree with quote:
A thirty footer is a small boat, period.

OK...done venting...sheesh!

(This post edited by trafik on 10/28/2005)
 

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ng622

I agree with the Power Squadron boating class! It is a 6 week boaters certification class that is offered all over the country - it includes a comprehensive overview of all aspects of boating and I feel offers a lot of good information. Here in CT passing it qualifies you for the CT boater's certificate that is mandatory to operate a boat in CT.

Also you get to be around a class full of other boaters, and you can ask questions and share information. It is a very good experience, and especially now with winter coming it's a good way to "keep your hand in" in regards to boating.

I have taken it and highly recommend it.

Here is a link with more info to locate a class near you:

locate a US Power Squadron boating class

USPS home page

(This post edited by MermaidCT on 10/28/2005)
 

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If I had it to do over again, I would start by joining a boating club like
Freedom Boat Club for a few years. You pay a set fee- about $4,000 a year, and get to use a choice of boats as often as you want.

This way you can start out learning how to use a smaller boat and work your way up without having the expense of trading in boats. They also teach you how to drive a boat and dock it. You can take out many different sizes and styles of boats and figure out what boat fits your style.
Then once you are comfortable with it - drop the club and buy a boat. You will also find out if you would use the boat enough to justify the expense.
Expenswise, it isn't bad.. I have a 23' boat and spend about that much just on dockage, winterization, services, cleaning..
 

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I don't understand why some people here think any boat under 25 ft is not a "family" boat. I've had boats from 16 ft to 32 ft and finally settled on a 23 ft'r. It doesn't have a stand up head, but a porta potty. It doesn't have a big cabin for sleeping, it's a cuddy, but the kids have slept in it if they got tired. Is it an overnight family boat?...no, but I have spent many "overnights" with my kids, when they're tired, they crawl into the cuddy and crash.
My boat is a 1971, and along side newer 23 ft'rs it looks small, yet I've had it for over 15 years and it has served my family well.
Any boat can be a family boat.

ng622 stated that the primary use is to be for inshore fishing, and a 23'ft'r is THE ideal size for that. As far as being able to go to the canyon or do some tuna and sharking trips, having your own boat "big" enough for that would be nice sure, but for the occassional trip out is it worth getting the bigger expensive boat that your gonna end up using in the bay mostly anyway. I love going out to Montauk now and then, but wouldn't buy a boat for it because it wouldn't be practical for me any other time, especially mooring, hauling and fuel cost. If I want to go for tuna, shark, etc... I'll ask to hitch a ride with someone. :)

ng622, you didn't mention how old are your kids and how many do you have? Do they even like fishing?, I know some guys whose wife and kids don't care for it so he goes alone most of the time.

Do you have freinds who have boats? If so, spend some time going out with other people on different size boats if possible and get a feel for what is comfortable to you. Then, make an informed decision.

didn't see the above post while I was typing. Thats what I meant.

(This post edited by gverb1219 on 10/28/2005)
 

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I have purchased my first boat ever this year.It is a 96 searay 215 express cruiser.I am only speaking from my personal experiences,but I think this is a good size starter boat.It is a small cruiser with a small head ,but it is plumbed to the gunnell so that you can pump it out on the water(friends brand new 23' has a tank he has to remove and manually dump---yuck!)VERY important in my opinion.I trailer it everywhere (no slip fees)and you get to try different bodies of water.We have done a couple overnighters with the kids.It came with a camper top wich essentially doubles your overnighting space.The kids sleep on deck and we sleep down below.I have done several fishing trips in the sound, 12 hrs with 4 guys (3 is more comforatable).I have also done a shark fishing trip 30 miles offshore with it.After much research and an auxillary fuel tank, I didn't have any problems.This boat has a pretty good hull for a boat this size,better than what most people picture for a boat this size.We hit some really nasty swells coming around Montauk pt. prob. 10-12ft,and did ok, The forecast was 2-4 ft seas.We fished all day and caught about 10 blue sharks.(Whaaata ball)On the way in,block island sound had a nasty 6-8 ft chop, not a comforatable ride but it was do-able.The most important thing is to watch the weather extra close.I have taken one offshore trip this season and cancelled about 5(with advice from members here-thank you)Still trying to get one more in, but very doubtful.I reallise that this is not the ideal offshore boat,but we are not all millionaires either.I wouldn't make a canyon run with this boat, but I think I am ok 30 miles out and < I took the safety class and bought "Chapmans Guide To Seamanship"book. If you do in fact buy a boat,I would recomend reading the book,take a few trips,then read it again.You will be surprised at how much more you will retain after "getting your feet wet"so to speak.I do all of these different activities without breaking the piggy bank.
 

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oh yeah!!!

I would not even consider doing anything near the ocean without a good GPS system and radio.Radar is good too, but outta my budget for now.In one summer I have boated in a lot of fog, and compass bearrings are not as easy to follow as one would think.
 

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ng622

you posted

"Now can any of you offer advice on how to convince my wife that it is OK to buy a boat??"

The time spent with the kids when there young is priceless.
Most women dont fish. some do with there boy friends some only on nice days. Seasick women are not a prety sight.If this is not a problem your lucky.
It was three yrs ago when I was in your shoes. and I got a 23ft that is wider than most at 9.6. and a bunk bed type layout for sleeping.
Turn key 10yr old boat recently repowered and new electronics,Done two years befor I bought it, single engine 225hp and 25hp kicker. two adults and up to three kids or me and 4 friends fish w/room to spare. Yes you can do day trips and long cruses with it. But are you a boater? I wasent. Got the boat because I worked at night and wanted to fish when I could. Did you ever park a boat? Nothing like crashing your new 40K doller toy into a dock or most likly another boat.
Anyway you can get over that, some don't but stay with it. I still dont care for "boating" I just use it for fishing as a means to fish. Ive gone out as far as 65mi. and from jones inlet to oyster bay. easyly.Glad I got the 23 instead of bigger as first boat, cause I fish alone and I can handle it better.
THERES A LOT OF GOOD ADVICE IN THIS THREAD by the others.
Were you will be boating from gives you a good ocean acess also crusing up the hudson.
Also buy something with good resale value and a boat that is in demand. Incase you dont like doing all the work of "boating". I will be trading up in 2yrs to a 32ft. But that will only let me go out on even worse dayes and get more beat up. I might rethink this because the expenice for that bigger boat dosent work because you can go on 85ft or 100ft party boats and not get beat up or do the work. When I go on party boats now I feel like a guest. Dont expect non fishing friends to come on your boat and do all the things you need done, there the guests and your the mate, captian, and responsable for there safty.
this is just my 2 cents. not being from a boating family.
You got alot to think about and doing the right thing by talking to people with all different views and reasons for getting a boat. But mostly fishing.
 

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my .02$

I have a slightly different opinion than some others that posted earlier. I think something in the 25 ft range is a better boat to learn on that 19-23. What I have seen in the past with new boaters is they buy a small boat for there first one and when there friends get wind of it they all want to go . This usually results in 5 guys a small boat being way overloaded. Next thing that usually happens is , one guy says hey lets go in the ocean and the proud owner wants to go as well on his new boat. Not knowing how his boat reacts to wind and wave or being familiar with how tides affect the inlet they go and more times than not they get into trouble. When most people buy a new boat they use it alot and not having a good understanding of how a 20 knt wind affects a 19 ft boat as to say a 25 ft boat you possibly could get more than you ask for if there is a good chop. I think with a 25 ft boat there is more of a saftey margin for captian errors in the weather dept. The difference in learning how to dock a 19 versus a 25 is not that drastic and a heavier boat will not react to the wind as much as a lighter boat.One thing to remember when docking is "BE PATIENT" take your time and let the boat tell you how you need to react.Since you have selected something with a cabin I will stay away from centerconsole boats. A few that come to mind are the 25 Parker , big ****pit, high freeboard, deep vee, enclosed cabin are a few benefits , the 25 Grady white sailfish not as much room as the parker but a good boat in that class . The 24 carolina classic is another good boat as well as the pursuit danali as mentioned before are quality boats. All of these also have a good resale value if you ever want to upgrade you will easily be able to move these brands . I am a center console guy and look at a boat more for fishability and functionality rather than comfort, but if I were buying a cabin boat and did a lot of bay work and some near costal offshore shark and tuna I would buy a 25 parker with twin yamaha 4 strokes 200 hp . It will have what amenities your family requires and good fishability for Dad . It may not have the sex appeal of some of the other boats but that means little to me . Best of luck with whatever you decide and enjoy it .JMHO
 

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I would buy a used boat in the 21 - 23 foot range. Easier to learn on and you won't feel so bad if (when) you bang into something. Boating is not as easy as it looks, wind and current have a big effect and it takes experiance to judge. So don't buy something you will be upset to put a small ding in. Also smaller capital outlay. No saying you are going to enjoy it, you may find it not worth the money and time you are going to put into it. I know plenty of people who bought boats, used them a couple of times and that was it. I love it, but I am always suprised at the number of people who don't

Good Luck !
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Thanks again for all the advice. Although I am not looking to buy anything immediately, I could not help looking at some of the websites and fantasize (too easy, don't go there!!). I came across the following boat--I know it is towards the larger end, but the price is right. Any thoughts??

YEAR 1998 LENGTH FEET 26
MAKE Wellcraft HULL TYPE FIBERGLASS/COMPOSITE
MODEL 264 Coastal WA ENGINE TYPE TWIN OUTBOARD
PRICE $34,000.00 FUEL GAS
LOCATION Lanoka Harbor, NJ CATEGORY SPORT FISHERMAN
CALL TOLL FREE: (877) 579-2545


DESCRIPTION
1998 Wellcraft 264 Coastal WA, 26' 0' 1998 WELLCRAFT 264 COASTAL WA. POWERED BY TWIN EVINRUDE OCEAN PROS (FICHT) SERIES OUTBOARDS  150 HP EACH. LOADED WITH ELECTRONICS. INCLUDES A RATHEON 620-10 GPS / CP WITH NEW MEMORY CHIP, FURUNO 667-6 COLOR DEPTH FINDER, RIGGING STATION WITH A CUTTING BOARD, 85 QUART LIVEWELL WITH LIGHTING, 85 QUART BAIT KEEPER, TWO INSULATED FISH BOXES AND MORE AND MORE! THIS BOAT IS FULLY EQUIPPED FOR SOME OFFSHORE FISHING! LOADED WITH ELECTRONICS  EQUIPPED FOR OFFSHORE FISHING - CALL US  877-579-2545 GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS:  Length: 26  Beam: 8 - 6  Draft: 34  Bridge Clearance: 8 - 6  Engine: Twin Evinrude Ocean-Pros (FICHT), 150HP (Each), Gasoline  Cruising Speed: 30 Knots  Maximum Speed: 40 Knots  Fuel Capacity: 150 Gallons HULL & DECK FEATURES:  85 Quart Livewell with Lighting  85 Quart Bait Keeper  2 Insulated Fish Boxes  2 Aft Facing Jump Seats Over Livewell and Bait Keeper  Electronics Box  8 Rod Holders  4 On The Hardtop  Spreader Lights  Built-In Tackle Box  Raw Water Washdown  Swim Platform with Transom Door  Trim Tabs  Navigation Lights  Bow Pulpit  Fresh Water Transom Shower  Ladder  Rigging Station with Cutting Boards  2 Sinks in Transom CANVAS:  Full Winter Cover  Hard Top with New Front and Rear Curtains CABIN FEATURES:  V-Berth and Mid Cabin Berth  Sleeps 3  Galley with Counter Top  Ice Box  Alcohol Stove  VacuFlush Toilet with Holding Tank  Dinette Table  Overhead Lighting  Screen Door and Hatch Into Cabin  V-Berth Extension ****PIT & HELM FEATURES:  Raytheon 620-10 GPS/CP with New Memory Chip  Furuno 667 6 Color Depthfinder  New Transducer  AM / FM / CD Stereo  Standard Eclipse VHF Radio  Fuel, Water Pressure, RPM, Trim, and Alarm Light Gauges (2 of Each)  Cup Holders ENGINE ROOM:  2 Batteries  2 Bilge Pumps AIR CONDITIONING/HEATING: No GENERATOR: No OPTIONS:  Anchor and Lines Included  Coast Guard Pack TRAILER: No LOADED  VERY CLEAN  PROFESSIONALLY MAINTAINED
 

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I've heard bad things about those engines. I could be wrong, but the FICHT engines had big problems from what I hear. Check into that further.


Otherwise, sounds like a lot of boat for the money (which isn't necessarily better).
 

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makobob wrote:
There is a lot of advice here, most of it bad.
If your taking a family out you want at least a 25 footer. Something left out, where are you boating? North Shore in the sound and eastern GSB and ocean travel requires a decent hull under you. On most days in Patchogue Bay, where I live, a 19-20 foot boat will make you wish you never bought it in the first place! The afternoon southwest wind will eat you alive! Same for Northwest/north in the Sound. To even think about ocean fishing, even on a calm day you need a 23, at least. It may be flat outside but the inlets can turn nasty in a flash! No place for smaller boats. A thirty footer is a small boat, period.

Rob - I fish out of Bay Shore, and fish where you are talking about, and I have never "wished I didnt buy my boat." I have a 20' C/C, and very rarely are there conditions in the bay that I wont go out in. Occasionally it can kick up and get real bad, but you have to watch the weather and know your way around a boat.

I have been 25 miles off in my boat, 3-5's when a 25 knot NE wind kicked up. Sure it was hairy, but rode the waves and got home fine. Not even a scare. I also fish in the ocean regurlarly all year long. So to say you need a 23'er to even think about going out in the ocean, your dead wrong.

To touch on the inlets turning nasty, your bound to get caught out there when they do, and the only thing you can rely on is experience to get you in. Again, pick and choose your days, and watch the weather. If a wind kicks up, get inside before the inlet turns to slop. If it is really really bad, and you have to wait it out, do it.

A smaller boat for someone looking to learn is the way to go. Unless you want to bang the crap out of your new boat while docking and maneuvering. A trained monkey could drive a boat out in the middle of the open bay, its in tight where you need to learn certain things that are much easier to learn on a smaller boat.

I am sure he is going to do whatever he wants to do, judging by the boat he is looking at, but all we can do is offer advise from a perspective that we have all done it before.

That Wellcraft he is looking at is a lot of boat for a beginner. Plus the engines are 7 year old Eveinrudes, and if they have any use, are probably almost ready for replacement. Depends on the hours. Oh, and that Wellcraft will pound the crap out of you. My uncle has one, and it is a rattler. Actually tight for a 26'er, real narrow (8'6" on a 26'er?????), and did I mention that it pounds. Test ride it first!!!
 

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Told Ya!

26' Is a nice size. It is simply the laws of physics, smaller boats are affected by wind, waves more than larger. The quickest way to pissing off your wife is to beat the crap out of her on a small boat.
Rob
Trafic go play on the LIE!
 
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