NorEast Fishing Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
30,413 Posts
ng622
Welcome to Noreast and the wonderful world of boating. I have to agree with Striker and the others. For a first time boater you should be looking for a used boat in the 19 to 23 ft range. As you stated, you have no experience as a boater. A boat in the 25 to 30 ft range is alot to handle. I'm not saying you can't do it, just that, as seygrunt said, it will hurt less when you run into your first sandbar or bounce of a couple rocks in the shallows. I, like most of the people here, have been on the water for a long time and could tell horror stories of what we have seen out there.
My intent is not to scare you from a big boat, but anyone who is just learning should do so with a boat that is more easily handled. Learn the waters and how a boat handles and reacts in different conditions and get the experience needed before stepping up.

Check out this link. It gives you an idea of what you can expect to run into now and then on the water. Try to avoid becomeing another post in this list. :)

the stupidist things you've seen people do on the water
 

· Registered
Joined
·
30,413 Posts
I don't understand why some people here think any boat under 25 ft is not a "family" boat. I've had boats from 16 ft to 32 ft and finally settled on a 23 ft'r. It doesn't have a stand up head, but a porta potty. It doesn't have a big cabin for sleeping, it's a cuddy, but the kids have slept in it if they got tired. Is it an overnight family boat?...no, but I have spent many "overnights" with my kids, when they're tired, they crawl into the cuddy and crash.
My boat is a 1971, and along side newer 23 ft'rs it looks small, yet I've had it for over 15 years and it has served my family well.
Any boat can be a family boat.

ng622 stated that the primary use is to be for inshore fishing, and a 23'ft'r is THE ideal size for that. As far as being able to go to the canyon or do some tuna and sharking trips, having your own boat "big" enough for that would be nice sure, but for the occassional trip out is it worth getting the bigger expensive boat that your gonna end up using in the bay mostly anyway. I love going out to Montauk now and then, but wouldn't buy a boat for it because it wouldn't be practical for me any other time, especially mooring, hauling and fuel cost. If I want to go for tuna, shark, etc... I'll ask to hitch a ride with someone. :)

ng622, you didn't mention how old are your kids and how many do you have? Do they even like fishing?, I know some guys whose wife and kids don't care for it so he goes alone most of the time.

Do you have freinds who have boats? If so, spend some time going out with other people on different size boats if possible and get a feel for what is comfortable to you. Then, make an informed decision.

didn't see the above post while I was typing. Thats what I meant.

(This post edited by gverb1219 on 10/28/2005)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
30,413 Posts
Does all this really matter anyway?

I've found in my experiences, that once someone has it in their mind the size and kind of boat they want or the boat they see and say "that's me", that's usually what they end up getting. Yes, they ask for advice from different sources, but usually go with their first thoughts.
I did it. Had to have that 32 ft'r. I was gonna do alot of "Montauck Fishing", sharks, tuna, etc... Had to have the sleeping, cabin, galley, enclosed head and all that.
The happiest day I've had in boating was when I downsized and bought my 23 Criss-Craft.

ng622 will learn the way a lot of people do, buy first, then after realizing the cost associated with maintainance, hauling, accesorizing, fuel, etc.. the rethinking kicks in.
Maybe he'll get lucky and get his dream boat right off the bat and everything will work out OK.
Maybe he wont, and it'll be a lesson learned.

Whatever the case, I hope ng622 will keep us updated on his journey into the wonderfull world of boating and fishing. :)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
30,413 Posts
Hopefully ng will have good luck with whatever he decides and will take the proper lessons needed as a first time boater.
We all have given our advice here, however good or bad it sounds to some. As the saying goes, "to each their own". He could very well turn out to be a "natural" and have no problems with the safe operation of his boat. Many people pick stuff up very quick. I know I do. Handleing big boats was not a problem with me, it was all the costs associated with keeping the big boat that was my problem.
If those aren't considerations he's worried about, then I wish him good luck in whatever he buys and hope to see pics of it.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top