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Why not a slot limit with one fish per day. Almost all the stripers over 36 inches are females. Doing the most to protect the females of the species would provide the biggest benefit. A slot limit of say 28 - 36 inches with a limit of one fish per person would still provide plenty of table fare. This would also give anglers a better chance to catch larger fish.

This is just an idea and I know those looking for the big cows as a wall hanger will be pissed (You guys would have to bring a camera and a ruler). I am not looking to piss any one off here. Honestly, I am satisfied with the current regulations. The bass fishing has been great for me this year. No real cows, but plenty of fish.
 

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It is unfortunate to hear that Byron feels that New York's sportfisherman could not be trusted to follow the regulations if a slot limit was instituted. Byron is a good man who speaks realistically. I also have spoken to him many times in the past. His beliefs, however should not be the deciding factor on gamefish regulations. Regulations should be based on what is best for the species.

Another option for consideration could be a slot limit (whatever size and number they feel is appropriate) and a seperate tag (which would be purchased for a minimal fee to cover the expense of the tag program) for a single trophy fish per season. It could be run like the tuna permits.
This would slow the harvesting of larger fish while still providing the opportunity to catch that tropy or record fish.

I believe that most of the NYS fisherman out there would continue to follow the laws if a slot limit was imposed. However, it might cause a few more of them to keep that illegal cow that they had been fishing a lifetime for. I remember when I was a kid and my father caught a 50 pounder in the surf during the moritorium. If there weren't 12 guys standing around by the time he got it in, the fish would have went home with us. I think he was almost ready to cry when he had to release it.

The DEC would just have to crack down on enforcement. Right now they have the right to confiscate a violaters' gear, even their boat or truck. Most of the time however, all anyone gets is a $50 fine. Stiffen the penalties and give a potential violator something to consider before he/she breaks the law.
 

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Hi Al,

-I am against the 36 inch limit. It targets larger females while promoting genetically smaller fish.

-I like the 28 inch limit better because it distributes pressure to the males.

-I would like to see a slot limit similar to what is described above.

-I think that individual states should be able to manage fish species independant of each other, but under the guidance of NMFS. Atlantic fish species migrate between many states and face different pressures between them. I beleive that individual states can address these pressures better than the broad brush approach of federal regulation.

KNOTME,

I never understood why the DEC gave the charter industry a two fish limit. I guess that the charter industry just has a better political lobby. From you response, I guess you are a charter boat captain. How can you honestly beleive that keeping the charter industry at two fish per angler is the best way to "help balance the population"?

As a group, charter boat captains (theoretically) have the highest percentage of skilled anglers and spend the most amount of time out on the water. The group with the best skill, takes out multiple fares (1-40), on multiple trips per day, on multiple days of the week and gets to keep the most fish!!!!!! If charters were only allowed ONE fish per day, that would help the fish populations tremendously. You also suggest that the private fisherman deal with confusing and constantly changing regulations, while the charter industry enjoys a nice steady size and take limit. COME ON!!!!!! This regulation is the DEC's greatest failing.

I would like to know the charter industry's resoning behind this regulation. THEY WOULDN'T GET ENOUGH FARES???? There are many charter fisheries throughout the country who make a living on trips that are catch and release. Look at tarpon or snook fishing in Florida or trout fishing in the midwest. Besides, cash in your pocket should not be a factor in the management of a public resource.
 

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I am with you on that end Mike. I also have no taste for fish and release everything I can. The only time I keep a fish is when it is legal size and obviously going to die anyway. In that situation I have many friends who want the fish.

I would also never begrudge another fisherman his right to keep fish for the table. I only question those who have to keep their limits all the time (50 porgies, 10 blues, 6 weakies) That is a lot of meat to clean and eat.

I also don't brag about releasing fish in my reports. On the other end, why is it necessary for anyone to brag about keeping their limit? It is not necessary either way.

Good luck to everyone, it looks like the game is back on out east.
 

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Fishing is their CHOSEN profession. That doesn't mean charter fisherman should get any special privelages. From the reports of charter captains I read here and on other sites, their fares catch and keep many 30 and 40 pound plus fish a year. Just through probability, with the amount of fishing man hours combined in the charter industry and the amount of fish caught, a lot of big fish are being elimated by charter boats.

One fish per man still provides plenty of meat. That one fish limit drives thousands of NY fisherman to spend millions on tackle and boats every year. I am sure that the charter industry would not be severley affected with the same limits.

Like you said "...they were awarded that privilage", and I congratulate them on having a better lobby than I do. Maybe next time around it will be different.
 

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What does learning the fishing spots and techniques have anything to do with keeping two fish? Fares would learn just as much by releasing the extra fish. They still saw what caught the fish and where. And you are right, that there are a lot of recreational fisherman out there who catch big fish also, but my point is, as a group the percentage is probably smaller and they can only keep the one for the day as opposed to two, which the charter boats can and do keep.

I don't fault the charter industry for this regulation. They are trying to protect their best interests. I blame the DEC for caving to their lobbiests, in lieu of sound management. I also don't blame charter captains for catching too many fish. Anyone who chooses to work in a job that is subject to government regulation has to accept the goverment regulations. In this case, they are. I feel the regualtions are wrong and I have already stated why.
 

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KNOTME,

Even if I was on a charter I would not keep anything. I personally don't like to eat fish, I enjoy the hunt and the fight. I know that I am in the minority though and most people given the opportunity, will keep their limits. And for whatever you are trying to get at about kingfish, I haven't fished for or caught any, ever. When we were kids, my brother caught one while weakfish fishing.

George,

Thank you for explaining the striper regulations throughout the Northeast. If what you are saying is correct about the regulations, it seems I am wrong to place blame on New York's charter industry and I apologize. But I cannot beleive that New York State recreational sportfisherman lobbied to have more restrictions put on themselves. Do you know what organization or group asked for that? I will ask Byron about it.

I also give charter boat captains more credit than being just a "taxi". Their skill and knowledge is giving people, who MIGHT not be able to catch a searobin on their own, a much greater chance of catching a trophy fish.

And commercial by-catch is a whole new discussion I will not even attempt to address.

I am just arguing for what seems fair to all of New York's anglers. If the recreational sector did in fact want stricter limits on themselves then I am also for it.

I will also quit beating the dead horse now.
 

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Hi Al,

I chose to avoid getting into the commercial by-catch issue is for two reasons.

-I dont think we have too many commercial fisherman on this site, and to start complaining about them would just lead to a very one sided debate. Of course most of the sportfisherman will hate the loss of stripers to by-catch.

-We have already strayed far away from the original topic of discussion on this thread and I didn't think we should start a new branch here. If you don't mind, then I am all for it.

Earlier this summer, there was a thread started here about a school of dead stripers found outside of Fire Island Inlet, the result of a dragger's by catch. I personally saw fish floating in the inlet the following two days. WHAT A WASTE OF A RESOURCE. The dilemma is, it seems that if the fish are caught and are going to die anyway, they should be allowed to by kept and sold. But how can you keep the commercial industry from using this loop hole as an excuse for illegally targeting fish and then using the by-catch as an excuse.



This message was edited by doughboy on 12-5-01 @ 12:17 PM
 
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