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A LETTER FROM CHINA

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wader


Joined: 08/09/2000
Posts: 24794
Location: Onancock VA
 posted 04/20/2006 01:07 PM  

long but rather interesting


"....inside every old person is a young person wondering what the hell happened??"
 
wader


Joined: 08/09/2000
Posts: 24794
Location: Onancock VA
 posted 07/08/2010 12:19 PM  

A Return Letter?

.
..U.S. Missiles Deployed Near China Send a Message



By MARK THOMPSON / WASHINGTON – Thu Jul 8, 8:50 am ET
If China's satellites and spies were working properly, there was a flood of unsettling intelligence flowing into the Beijing headquarters of the Chinese Navy last week. A new class of U.S. super weapon had suddenly surfaced nearby. It was an Ohio-class submarine, which for decades carried only nuclear missiles targeted against the Soviet Union, and then Russia. But this one was different: for nearly three years, the U.S. Navy has been dispatching modified "boomers" to who knows where (they do travel underwater, after all). Four of the 18 ballistic-missile subs no longer carry nuclear-tipped Trident missiles. Instead, they now hold up to 154 Tomahawk cruise missiles, capable of hitting anything within 1,000 miles with non-nuclear warheads.

Their capability makes watching these particular submarines especially interesting. The 14 Trident-carrying subs are useful in the unlikely event of a nuclear Armageddon, and Russia remains their prime target. But the Tomahawk-outfitted quartet carries a weapon that the U.S. military has used repeatedly against targets in Afghanistan, Bosnia, Iraq and Sudan. (See pictures of the U.S. military in the Pacific.)

That's why alarm bells would have sounded in Beijing June 28 when the Tomahawk-laden 560-foot USS Ohio popped up in the Philippines' Subic Bay. More alarms likely were sounded when the USS Michigan arrived in Pusan, South Korea, the same day. And the klaxons would have maxed out as the USS Florida surfaced the same day at the joint U.S.-British naval base at Diego Garcia, a flyspeck of an island in the Indian Ocean. The Chinese military awoke to find as many as 462 additional Tomahawks deployed by the U.S. in its neighborhood. "There's been a decision to bolster our forces in the Pacific," says Bonnie Glaser, a China expert at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington. "There is no doubt that China will stand up and take notice."

U.S. officials deny any message is being directed at Beijing, saying the Tomahawk triple-play was a coincidence. But they did make sure news of the new deployments appeared in the Hong Kong-based South China Morning Post - on July 4, no less. The Chinese took notice quietly. "At present, common aspirations of countries in the Asian and Pacific regions are seeking for peace, stability and regional security," Wang Baodong, spokesman for the Chinese Embassy in Washington, said Wednesday. "We hope the relevant U.S. military activities will serve for the regional peace, stability and security, and not the contrary." (See pictures of the most expensive military planes.)

Last month, the Navy had announced that all four of the Tomahawk Tridents were operationally deployed away from their home ports for the first time. Each vessel packs "the firepower of multiple surface ships," says Capt. Tracy Howard, commander, Submarine Squadron 16 in Kings Bay, Ga., and can "respond to diverse threats on short notice."

The move forms part of a policy by the U.S. government to shift firepower from the Atlantic to the Pacific theater, which Washington sees as the military focus of the 21st Century. Reduced tensions since the end of the Cold War has seen the U.S. scale back its deployment of nuclear weapons, allowing the Navy to reduce its Trident fleet from 18 to 14. (Why 14 subs, as well as bombers and land-based missiles carrying nuclear weapons, are still required to deal with the Russian threat is a topic for another day.) (Read "Obama Shelves U.S. Missile Shield: The Winners and Losers.")

Sure, the Navy could have retired the four additional subs and saved the Pentagon some money, but that's not how bureaucracies operate. Instead, it spent about $4 billion replacing the Tridents with Tomahawks and making room for 60 special-ops troops to live aboard each sub and operate stealthily around the globe. "We're there for weeks, we have the situational awareness of being there, of being part of the environment," Navy Rear Adm. Mark Kenny explained after the first Tomahawk Trident set sail in 2008. "We can detect, classify and locate targets and, if need be, hit them from the same platform."

The submarines aren't the only new potential issue of concern for the Chinese. Two major military exercises involving the U.S. and its allies in the region are now underway. More than three dozen naval ships and subs began participating in the "Rim of the Pacific" war games off Hawaii on Wednesday. Some 20,000 personnel from 14 nations are involved in the biennial exercise which includes missile exercises and the sinking of three abandoned vessels playing the role of enemy ships. Nations joining the U.S. in what is billed as the world's largest-ever naval war game are Australia, Canada, Chile, Colombia, France, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, Netherlands, Peru, Singapore and Thailand. Closer to China, CARAT 2010 - for Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training - just got underway off Singapore. The operation involves 17,000 personnel and 73 ships from the U.S., Singapore, Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand. (Read "Hu's Visit: Finding a Way Forward on U.S.-China Relations.")

China is absent from both exercises, and that's no oversight. Many nations in the eastern Pacific, including Australia, Japan, Indonesia, South Korea and Vietnam, have been encouraging the U.S. to push back against what they see as China's increasingly aggressive actions in the South China Sea. And the U.S. military remains concerned over China's growing missile force - now more than 1,000 - near the Taiwan Strait. The Tomahawks' arrival "is part of a larger effort to bolster our capabilities in the region," Glaser says. "It sends a signal that nobody should rule out our determination to be the balancer in the region that many countries there want us to be." No doubt Beijing got the signal.





"....inside every old person is a young person wondering what the hell happened??"

This post edited by wader 12:20 PM 07/08/2010
 
MakoMike
Noreast.com Club Member


Noreast Writer

Joined: 12/28/2000
Posts: 71023
Location: Pt. Judith
 posted 07/08/2010 12:39 PM  

Every time I visit China I am amazed at how willing the people are to give up freedom in exchange for economic benefits. Especially the members of the Chinese disapora that are now emigrating back to China.


====MakoMike=====

Click here for The Makomania Sportfishing website

Makomania out
 
Blazetoy


Joined: 01/24/2002
Posts: 3321
Location: I live in the land of nonsense
 posted 07/08/2010 11:44 PM  

Eff China...buy American!!!

Sames Goes for Toyota, Nissan, Benz, BMW, Audi, Porshe...

Remember what those countries did to the US in the past!!!

Eff Them!!!


WTF I DO WRONG NOW?
 
FinDiesel


Joined: 06/21/2005
Posts: 541
Location: Fire Island Inlet NY
 posted 07/09/2010 07:27 AM  

Blazetoy wrote:

Eff China...buy American!!!

Sames Goes for Toyota, Nissan, Benz, BMW, Audi, Porshe...

Remember what those countries did to the US in the past!!!

Eff Them!!!



Yeah!, and don't forget Jaguar, Bentley and Triumph!
Remember what that sob King George III did to us!!
Toungue


"The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure, and the intelligent are full of doubt"  -Bertrand Russell
 
tonyzfishin


Joined: 02/04/2006
Posts: 29505
Location: Raritan Bay NY
 posted 07/09/2010 07:37 AM  

FinDiesel wrote:

Blazetoy wrote:

Eff China...buy American!!!

Sames Goes for Toyota, Nissan, Benz, BMW, Audi, Porshe...

Remember what those countries did to the US in the past!!!

Eff Them!!!



Yeah!, and don't forget Jaguar, Bentley and Triumph!
Remember what that sob King George III did to us!!
Toungue


dont you own a jag blaze.....ConfusedConfusedRollRollRollRollRollRoll
 
JAYBASS


Joined: 04/08/2009
Posts: 9134
Location: IN THE WASH!!!!!!
 posted 07/09/2010 08:22 AM  

tonyzfishin wrote:

FinDiesel wrote:

Blazetoy wrote:

Eff China...buy American!!!

Sames Goes for Toyota, Nissan, Benz, BMW, Audi, Porshe...

Remember what those countries did to the US in the past!!!

Eff Them!!!



Yeah!, and don't forget Jaguar, Bentley and Triumph!
Remember what that sob King George III did to us!!
Toungue


dont you own a jag blaze.....ConfusedConfusedRollRollRollRollRollRoll


surprise


2009-13 DEADSTICK CHAMP, A-Team Hostage Crisis Unit, Lead Negotiator, LEAD INVESTIGATOR, INVESTIGATIVE DIVISION OF RAIBS

FIX NOREAST, GET RID OF THE POLITICAL THREAD...
 
wader


Joined: 08/09/2000
Posts: 24794
Location: Onancock VA
 posted 08/05/2010 09:59 AM  

Chinese missile could shift Pacific power balance

ABOARD THE USS GEORGE WASHINGTON – Nothing projects U.S. global air and sea power more vividly than supercarriers. Bristling with fighter jets that can reach deep into even landlocked trouble zones, America's virtually invincible carrier fleet has long enforced its dominance of the high seas.

China may soon put an end to that.


U.S. naval planners are scrambling to deal with what analysts say is a game-changing weapon being developed by China — an unprecedented carrier-killing missile called the Dong Feng 21D that could be launched from land with enough accuracy to penetrate the defenses of even the most advanced moving aircraft carrier at a distance of more than 1,500 kilometers (900 miles).

Analysts say final testing of the missile could come as soon as the end of this year, though questions remain about how fast China will be able to perfect its accuracy to the level needed to threaten a moving carrier at sea.

The weapon, a version of which was displayed last year in a Chinese military parade, could revolutionize China's role in the Pacific balance of power, seriously weakening Washington's ability to intervene in any potential conflict over Taiwan or North Korea. It could also deny U.S. ships safe access to international waters near China's 11,200-mile (18,000-kilometer) -long coastline.

While a nuclear bomb could theoretically sink a carrier, assuming its user was willing to raise the stakes to atomic levels, the conventionally-armed Dong Feng 21D's uniqueness is in its ability to hit a powerfully defended moving target with pin-point precision.



"....inside every old person is a young person wondering what the hell happened??"
 
wader


Joined: 08/09/2000
Posts: 24794
Location: Onancock VA
 posted 09/21/2010 10:23 AM  

China TELLS U.S. to keep out of South China Sea dispute

BEIJING (Reuters) – China told the United States not to interfere in a regional dispute over claims to the South China Sea, saying it would only complicate the matter.

Japan's NHK TV reported last week that the United States and southeast Asian countries may announce a joint statement on September 24 that obliquely presses China over its recent activities near disputed isles in the South China Sea.

China has been increasingly strident in asserting its territorial claims, especially maritime ones.

In the past week, it has suspended high-level exchanges with Japan and promised tough counter-measures after a court there extended the detention of the captain of a Chinese boat which collided with two Japanese coastguard ships near disputed islands.



"We express great concern about any possible South China Sea announcement made by the United States and the ASEAN countries," Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Jiang Yu told a regular news briefing. ASEAN is the 10-member Association of Southeast Asian Nations.

"We resolutely oppose any country which has no connection to the South China Sea getting involved in the dispute, and we oppose the internationalization, multilateralization or expansion of the issue. It cannot solve the problem, but make it more complicated," she said.

Washington has criticized Chinese claims to swathes of the South China Sea, where Taiwan and several ASEAN members including Vietnam, Malaysia and the Philippines also assert sovereignty.

China says it has sovereignty over the seas, home to valuable fishing grounds and largely unexploited oil and natural gas fields.

It reacted with anger in July when the United States brought up the issue at a regional meeting, further souring ties between Beijing and Washington already under strain from spats over the value of the Chinese currency, Tibet and Taiwan.

While there have been no military clashes in the seas for years, China and some of the other claimants have been building up their military presence in the region.



"....inside every old person is a young person wondering what the hell happened??"
 
reelfun


Joined: 09/02/2001
Posts: 1715
Location: FI Inlet
 posted 09/27/2010 06:36 AM  

Because of the manufacturing technology that has been given to China they can build anything they want. This includes military requirements.As they become more proficient with the processes and engineering their political arrogance will increase. There position will be KMCA and the world will.




CaptLarryH
 
MakoMike
Noreast.com Club Member


Noreast Writer

Joined: 12/28/2000
Posts: 71023
Location: Pt. Judith
 posted 09/28/2010 08:09 AM  

Pat Buchanan – Tue Sep 28, 3:00 am ET
Creators Syndicate – Hubris will do it ever time.
The Chinese have just made a serious strategic blunder.
They dropped the mask and showed their scowling face to Asia, exposing how the Middle Kingdom intends to deal with smaller powers, now that she is the largest military and economic force in Asia and second largest on earth.
A fortnight ago, a Chinese trawler rammed a Japanese patrol boat in the Senkaku Islands administered by Japan but also claimed by China. Tokyo released the ship and crew, but held the captain.
His immediate return was demanded by Beijing.
Japan refused. China instantly escalated the minor incident into a major confrontation, threatening a cut off of Japan's supply of "rare-earth" materials, essential to the production of missiles, batteries and computers.
Through predatory trading, China had killed its U.S. competitor in rare-earth materials, establishing almost a global monopoly.
The world depends on China.
Japan capitulated and released the captain.
Now Beijing has decided to rub Japan's nose in her humiliation by demanding a full apology and compensation.
Suddenly, the world sees, no longer as through a glass darkly, the China that has emerged from a quarter century of American indulgence, patronage and tutelage since Tiananmen Square.
The Chinese tiger is all grown up, and it's not cuddly anymore.
And with Beijing's threat to use its monopoly of rare-earth materials to bend nations to its will, how does the Milton Friedmanite free-trade ideology of the Republican Party, which fed Beijing $2 trillion in trade surpluses at America's expense over two decades, look now?
How do all those lockstep Republican votes for Most Favored Nation status for Beijing, ushering her into the World Trade Organization and looking the other way as China dumped into our markets, thieved our technology and carted off our factories look today?
The self-sufficient republic that could stand alone in the world is more dependent than Japan on China for rare-earth elements vital to our industries, for the necessities of our daily life, and for the loans to finance our massive trade and budget deficits.
How does the interdependence of nations in a global economy look now, compared to the independence American patriots from Alexander Hamilton to Calvin Coolidge guaranteed to us, that enabled us to win World War II in Europe and the Pacific in less than four years?
Yet China's bullying of Japan is beneficial, for it may wake us up to the world as it is, as it has been, and ever shall be.
Consider.
China now claims all the Paracel and Spratly islands in the South China Sea, though Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines, Taiwan and Brunei border that sea. To reinforce her claim, a Chinese fighter jet crashed a U.S EP-3 surveillance plane 80 miles off Hainan Island in 2001. Not until Secretary of State Colin Powell apologized twice did China agree to release the American crew.
China's claim to the Senkakus (the Diaoyu Islands to the Chinese) was emphasized last week. While these are largely volcanic rocks rather than habitable islands, ownership would give a nation a powerful claim to all the oil, gas and minerals in the East China Sea.
China has repeatedly warned the United States to keep its warships, especially carriers, out of the 100-mile-wide Taiwan Strait. On the mainland opposite, Beijing has planted 1,000 missiles to convince Taipei of the futility and cost of declaring independence.
When the U.S. Navy launched exercises with South Korea after the sinking of South Korea's warship Cheonan by the North, China threatened the United States should it move the 97,000-ton carrier George Washington into the Yellow Sea between Korea and China. The carrier stayed out of the Yellow Sea and remained east of the Korean Peninsula.
In addition to her claims to sovereignty over all the seas off her southern and eastern coasts, China occupies a large tract of Indian land in the Aksai Chin area of India's northwest. Thousands of square miles were seized by Beijing in the 1962 war with New Delhi — and annexed.
In 1969, China and the Soviet Union battled on the Amur and Ussuri rivers over lands Czar Alexander I seized at the end of that bloodiest war of the 19th century, the Chinese civil war known as the Taiping Rebellion. Leonid Brezhnev reportedly sounded out the Nixon White House on U.S. reaction to Soviet use of atomic weapons to effect the nuclear castration of Mao's China.
China's claims to her lost lands in Siberia and the Russian Far East have not been forgotten in Beijing, and remain on Chinese maps.
How should America respond?
As none of these territorial disputes involves our vital interests, we should stay out and let free Asia get a good close look at the new China. Then explore the depths of our own dependency on this bellicose Beijing and determine how to restore our economic independence.
Ending the trade deficit with China now becomes a matter of national security.


====MakoMike=====

Click here for The Makomania Sportfishing website

Makomania out
 
wader


Joined: 08/09/2000
Posts: 24794
Location: Onancock VA
 posted 09/28/2010 10:01 AM  

The Dragon is truly showing us its wings & the fire in its belly..........

Question is: What do we do about it?


"....inside every old person is a young person wondering what the hell happened??"
 
reelfun


Joined: 09/02/2001
Posts: 1715
Location: FI Inlet
 posted 09/29/2010 08:55 AM  

It’s obvious the slide of America has happened gradually over various administrations. Equally obvious is the fact that America and its greedy quest for cheep product have fueled the Chinese economy and technology bloom while limiting our own. Most Americans are too preoccupied to realize how this will be used against them. It seems the average IQ for Americans is in a decline.




CaptLarryH
 
MakoMike
Noreast.com Club Member


Noreast Writer

Joined: 12/28/2000
Posts: 71023
Location: Pt. Judith
 posted 10/01/2010 04:29 PM  

Is Obama ready for a stare-down with China?

By the Monitor's Editorial Board – 2 hrs 52 mins ago
After nearly two years in office, President Obama remains untested as a commander in chief during a tense standoff – his own Cuban missile crisis, for instance, or Iranian hostage-taking, Iraqi invasion of Kuwait, or 9/11.
But he'd best prepare for such an encounter in Asia.
Last month, China bared its fangs at America’s chief Asian ally, Japan. Beijing appeared to precipitate a crisis with its weak neighbor when the captain of a Chinese fishing boat deliberately rammed two Japanese Coast Guard vessels near the Senkaku Islands.
For more than a century, Japan has had clear legal control of those rocky, uninhabited islands near Okinawa. But that has not stopped China from recently seeking ownership of them for offshore oil or to show everyone – especially the US Navy – who’s the new boss in Asian waters.
Beijing surprisingly escalated the incident after Japan detained the captain. China retaliated by halting critical mineral exports to Japan and arrested four Japanese visiting China. Even before the incident, the Chinese Navy had been swarming near the islands.
After two weeks of hostile reactions, Japan finally capitulated Sept. 24, releasing the captain. But not before other Asian nations saw just how much of a bully China has become.
The United States praised Tokyo’s decision as a diplomatic necessity – but not before quietly stating that the defense treaty with Japan would require the US military to defend the islands if China took them by force.
The crisis still lingers. China and Japan are demanding apologies. And Tokyo is considering whether to station its regular troops near the Senkaku Islands. The incident is thus a wake-up call for Mr. Obama to prepare for China again flexing its muscles in a dangerous way.
Obama’s national security strategy, however, is to primarily focus on rebuilding the US. Indeed, in September, when China protested about a planned military exercise in the Yellow Sea with a US aircraft carrier, the US backed down rather than risk Chinese anger. And Obama didn’t do much to persuade Beijing that its ally, North Korea, was guilty of sinking a South Korean naval ship last March, killing 46 sailors.
In July, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton did take a legal stand against China’s bold claims to a set of disputed islands in the South China Sea, saying the claims must be resolved with multilateral diplomacy. But the US hasn’t done much about that since then.
President Clinton was tested by China in 1996 after it lobbed missiles near Taiwan. He sent two aircraft carriers into the area in a show of defense for the island nation, which China claims as its own.
But these days China sees the US as weak. The American economy is stagnant. Many of the top Obama officials, such as Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel and Defense Secretary Robert Gates, are leaving the administration. The president wants major cuts in the Pentagon. US forces began to leave Iraq this year, and Obama plans to start a US retreat from Afghanistan next year.
Since 2009, China has become more assertive in Asia. It recently told its neighbors that they are “small countries” while China is a “large country” – and that they should not expect an equal relationship.
This bluntness only raised fears of confrontation, especially as China expands it naval reach. Japan now wonders if it can count on the US in a crisis. It is considering a boost in its military spending. Over the past decade, Japan’s defense budget has declined about 5 percent – while China’s spending on its forces has soared.
Obama can help Japan by encouraging it to raise its military spending and invest in more defensive weapons. Such US advice is often needed to overcome decades of Japanese reluctance to become a military power again.
Next month, Japan will host a summit of Asian and Pacific countries. This will provide an opportunity for Obama to make clear where the US stands on China’s coercive actions and his own readiness to respond to a crisis in the region.
China must be persuaded that there is plenty of room in Asia for big nations to work together for security and prosperity. Those nations include Australia, India, the US, Japan, Indonesia, and yes, China.
But until China sees its role as a benign benefactor in Asia, a US president should be ready to check China if it tries to strong-arm its neighbors in an imperialist way or hold them hostage to threats.
If other Asian nations can’t look to the US for backup, they would be well advised to start looking more to themselves.


====MakoMike=====

Click here for The Makomania Sportfishing website

Makomania out
 
reelfun


Joined: 09/02/2001
Posts: 1715
Location: FI Inlet
 posted 10/05/2010 02:41 AM  

This will be a good test for the UN/NWO.

Paul Joseph Watson
Prison Planet.com
Friday, February 26, 2010
Leaked policy documents reveal that the United Nations plans to create a “green world order” by 2012 which will be enforced by a structure of global governance and funded by a gargantuan $45 trillion transfer of wealth from richer countries, as the globalists’ insidious plan to centralize power, crush sovereignty while devastating the economy is exposed once again.


CaptLarryH
 
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