Username:
Password:
Get Account    
Login
         Home  |  Magazine  |  Reports  |  Discussion  |  Blogs  |  Photos  |  Tides  |  Weather  |  Community  |  Updates  |  Fishing Info  |  Contact

HomeSearchTop PostersToday's Active Topics



What length of Paddle should I buy? Is Lifetime Tamarack 120 a good Kayak?



  Discussion Boards > Kayak Fishing Forum
Author Message
fishmak


Joined: 11/05/2008
Posts: 77
 posted 08/10/2013 06:09 PM  

Dear all, Yesterday passed by Sports Authority, the Lifetime tamarack Angler 120 was on sale for $250, so without hesitation I Brought it (My First Kayak) Did I make a mistake?

Now, I am looking for Paddle, what length should I get? 200cm, 210cm.... I am 5 feet 7 inches, the kayak is sit on top 10ft.

Extra question: How do I test if the kayak is not leaking? Or regular check on a new Kayak? Nervous on the kayak, Sport Authority told me, "Once is sold, it's yours.) They will not accept return (Poor Customer Service)!

Thank you so much! Very nervous to try it on the sea!
 
pequa1


Joined: 02/10/2007
Posts: 1410
Location: 'pequa'
 posted 08/10/2013 06:33 PM  

I won't waste your time telling you that a local kayak shop would have measured you and knowing the beam of the yak gotten the length of the paddle required down to a centimeter. You get what you pay for and you pay for advice and service at a local. Hopefully the big box salesman convinced you to go blaze orange, bright and light lime green, or yellow. If you are nervous, I suggest doing a lot of internet research on kayaking and of course wear a PFD. Always. Get one made for kayaking which rides well above the waist in back. Put a leash on the paddle. Use it. Still nervous. Take a day off from work and put in on a quiet beach or ramp on a weekday. There are some excellent videos on you tube. When my wife and I rented a tandem in Kailua, we had to watch a ten minute safety video and I wish I had that. It was excellent and I told them so.


bringing home venison is now as easy as a bay-caught keeper fluke !

betwixt FI and JI
 
fishmak


Joined: 11/05/2008
Posts: 77
 posted 08/10/2013 10:46 PM  

pequa1 wrote:

I won't waste your time telling you that a local kayak shop would have measured you and knowing the beam of the yak gotten the length of the paddle required down to a centimeter. You get what you pay for and you pay for advice and service at a local. Hopefully the big box salesman convinced you to go blaze orange, bright and light lime green, or yellow. If you are nervous, I suggest doing a lot of internet research on kayaking and of course wear a PFD. Always. Get one made for kayaking which rides well above the waist in back. Put a leash on the paddle. Use it. Still nervous. Take a day off from work and put in on a quiet beach or ramp on a weekday. There are some excellent videos on you tube. When my wife and I rented a tandem in Kailua, we had to watch a ten minute safety video and I wish I had that. It was excellent and I told them so.


Thank you for your advice! I will keep search for more information! Of course, any inputs are welcome!
 
spitdog

Joined: 06/17/2010
Posts: 103
 posted 08/11/2013 05:09 PM  

You bought an entry level kayak. A 220 cm paddel will work find. Don't spend a lot of money on this at this time. The reason I say that is if you like the sport, you will soon have the desire to upgrade.

Everybody that gets in this sport and stays wish they had bought something different.

You were smart, you have not invested much, get a paddle and a PFD and just get out and paddle.

Read the kayak fishing Internet sites and you will learn and grow with the sport just like we all did. Good luck and always where your pfd.
 
pequa1


Joined: 02/10/2007
Posts: 1410
Location: 'pequa'
 posted 08/11/2013 06:46 PM  

I had hesitated to tell my own kayak buying tale as I did not follow the norm, and did not opt for entry level. Anyway, at the time being in my mid 50s, and about 5'8", 155 lbs. and needing to carry the yak to a beach or ramp, I wanted something light in weight yet long enough to track well. Not new to boating or canoeing, I nonetheless did a LOT of research on yaks and ended up at The Dinghy Shop in Amityville, run by Jim and Susan Kohler, the closest shop to me. they featured Hurricane Aquasport Phoenix yaks, and advised me at the time in May of that year that the firm was coming out with a 14', having only a 12'. Longer means better tracking. The Phoenix is made with a light weight but tough plastic and my 14' weighs just 56 lbs. despite its generous beam. While I have "washed over" from the 40 and 50 footers that infest Massapequa, I have never come close to tipping over (knock wood.) I think it set me back about a grand, plus $150. for the paddle, and more for a seat with pockets, a kayak PFD, etc. I had them install rod holders as the installation was free as long as I bought from them and their prices were very good. I since went from a minivan which carried my yak across the two rear bench seats and with a goal post rack out of the boat hitch, to a Ford Ranger with Trak Racks (think ladder rack but better) wherein I heave the yak up onto the racks. Now 9 years later I would not want to do anything different. The pedal boat Hobies probably make fishing easier, but that stuff adds weight which I definitely want to avoid, and as I stated above I just don't feel a pedal boat equates to kayaking. I will change my mind if Hobies are allowed in the Olympics. the good news is you, if you decide to stick with it and upgrade, will lose very little in selling what you have and will have gained a ton of experience and fun.


bringing home venison is now as easy as a bay-caught keeper fluke !

betwixt FI and JI
 
spitdog

Joined: 06/17/2010
Posts: 103
 posted 08/11/2013 09:17 PM  

Wow 56 lbs. that is lite. I bet my T120 weights 80lb loaded easy. All's I do is slide it in the back of my truck and go. I wouldn't even think of lifting that.
 
  Discussion Boards > Kayak Fishing Forum  
Jump to:  




2019 Noreast Media, LLC.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.