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Not even a Bluefish

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  Discussion Boards > LI Sound Fishing
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yobird

Joined: 06/14/2006
Posts: 25
Location: Stamford CT
 posted 07/10/2008 08:19 PM  

3 1/2 hours form 11 till 2.30 chuming,fish all around the boat so my sounder says, What am I doing wong? I need help
 
leftjammer

Joined: 08/24/2003
Posts: 1635
Location: Nassau County USA
 posted 07/11/2008 03:08 PM  

Too much chum?
Are you sure you are reading fish?
What bait are you using?
What are you fishing for?


"no electrons were harmed during the transmission of this posting"
 
yobird

Joined: 06/14/2006
Posts: 25
Location: Stamford CT
 posted 07/11/2008 03:27 PM  

Thanks jammer. fresh bunker chunks, For chumming I got so bunker chumm
from the bait shop, frozen,the guy said to put the pot dowm 15 feet in 50 ft of water. the sounder beeping and I see fish swimming, some on the top and the middle.
 
HUNGEY

Joined: 09/02/2006
Posts: 66
Location: western sound
 posted 07/11/2008 07:44 PM  

blue fish

went out last night, trolled with a black tube down about 45ft i stopped at four fish could have gone all night. run boat at 1000rpms. off of city island at dusk good luck
 
fish4me


Joined: 09/01/2005
Posts: 16692
Location: Miller Place
 posted 07/11/2008 07:53 PM  

Chum to keep the fish interested, not to feed them.


 
likeitreallyis


Joined: 10/28/2005
Posts: 16948
Location: Rolling in the deep....
 posted 07/11/2008 10:28 PM  

where you fishing with bunker chunks also?


Green Grass and High Tides forever,,,
 
RJCAPPY


Joined: 01/18/2006
Posts: 323
Location: Western Sound
 posted 07/12/2008 12:57 AM  

Make sure the unit didn't switch back to DEMO MODE.
 
bass28


Joined: 05/16/2007
Posts: 757
 posted 07/12/2008 02:50 AM  

just take a popper in a boulder field make sure youd dont HIT the bloulders or just bucktail in deeper waters(trolling).
 
yobird

Joined: 06/14/2006
Posts: 25
Location: Stamford CT
 posted 07/12/2008 05:24 AM  

yes bunker chunks? whats size should I use?
 
gverb1219


Joined: 07/11/2003
Posts: 34945
Location: ....knee deep in the water somewhere
 posted 07/12/2008 07:45 AM  

yobird wrote:

yes bunker chunks? whats size should I use?



There is a great deal of confusion among anglers who are new to bunker-chunking. The most common question is, "How big should the chunk be?" You want big, fat hunks of meat on your hook - not little slices or cubes. One adult bunker should make four or five "chunks" of bait - including the head and tail. Pass a 7/0 or 8/0 hook through the meat at the top of the chunk ONE TIME, leaving the hook point out the other side, completely exposed. Please don't bury the hook inside the chunk. The head is the best part, so make sure you use it. When fishing chunks of bunker, check and change your bait every fifteen to twenty minutes. By that formula, one bunker is good for one hour of chunking with one rod.

Keep your reel in free spool with the clicker on. When you get a pick up, wait until the fish runs steady for several seconds. Next, put your reel in gear, wait for the line to come tight and set the hook. Bunker chunks are usually fished on the bottom, and fish-finder rigs work well. Sometimes it can be more productive to chunk without any weight, so don't be afraid to experiment if the fishing is slow.

The usual chunking setup is to anchor up-tide of some type of structure. A channel edge or deep hole can be productive, but you don't always need a dramatic piece of bottom to catch fish. A general change in depth is often enough to draw stripers, and the contour line west of Old Orchard Shoal where the water drops from sixteen feet to twenty feet draws loads of big bass every spring. Once anchored, I put two baits close to the stern, and two more baits further back. Once that's done, it's time to pour a cup of coffee, sit back and wait for the bass right? Wrong!

To draw bass to your boat, you'll need more than four chunks of bunker in the water. It's time to start chumming, and like everything else there is a logical way of getting the most response for your effort. For many anglers, chumming means cutting up bunker and haphazardly tossing the pieces in the water. While that might help, there is a better way. The number one rule is, don't feed the fish! You want to attract them - not feed them. That means cutting small - and I mean small - pieces of bunker. Usually, I fillet a bunker and slice the fillets into fingernail-size cubes. When you have cut up a bunker for chum, toss a handful of cubes toward the bow of the boat. The small pieces create a scent ball. Putting it in front of your boat gives it additional time to sink as it gets back behind your baits. Early into your trip, you want to put a scent ball out every few minutes. Once the bass come into your zone, you can chum less often. They will relate the area to bunker chunks, and the baits will be enough to keep them interested.

Live-lining bunker has got to be one of the most exciting ways to catch striped bass. Generally speaking, medium to heavy conventional gear is best for this type of fishing. I pass my hook through the back of the bunker's head and send him off to battle. Many anglers prefer a hook through the lips of the bunker, but I have found two problems with that method. First, when you "button his lip," you prevent your bait from breathing. Cons- equently, your bunker will not last as long. The second problem is that bass swallow their meals head-first. Hooks that are directly in front of your bunker have a way of driving themselves right into the bunker's gill-plate when you set the hook. If your hook is buried back into the bunker, it's going to be tough to hook your bass.

Once our live bunker has reached the strike zone, I leave the reel in free-spool, but engage the clicker. Keeping your thumb on the spool, maintain contact with the bunker while it is swimming. When a pick up is imminent, your bunker will become very active. There may be one or two short runs as the bass positions the bunker to be swallowed. The long, smooth run that follows is the bass swimming away with your bait. Point your rod in the direction of the fish, count to five and engage the reel. As the line comes tight, lift the rod with a solid, smooth motion. You don't have to go crazy setting the hook if the fish is swimming away from you. The swimming motion of the fish will help drive the hook home. An exaggerated setting motion greatly increases the risk of something breaking.

When fishing with live bunker around the schools, I put a slice or two in the tail of my bunker. Here's the logic. The bunker that I put on my line will rejoin the school for protection when he returns to the water. If I can slow my bunker down, it will not be able to keep up when the school tries to escape the stripers. My bunker will be the slowest in the school. That means it will be straggling behind the rest of the bunker as they escape the feeding bass.

Sometimes I'll put some bunker in the live well and head off to another location that is holding stripers, but no bunker. In that situation the bunker does not need to be slowed in any way. The simple fact that the bunker is alone in open water is enough of a handicap. If stripers are present, they will find your live bunker in a hurry. The striped bass that you find away from the main schools of bunker are often larger than the ones riding herd on the school. Before moving on to other methods, let's take a closer look at the equipment necessary for the above methods. The preferred rod for bunker fishing is a medium to heavy conventional stick, from six to seven feet in length for boat anglers, and eight to ten feet for surfcasters. This is not the time for fooling around with light gear, and I believe in using a minimum of 30-pound-test. I usually go with 40-pound-test line on the reel, and use a four-foot length of fifty-pound-test for leader material. Why so heavy? Fishing in and around schools of bunker is hell on monofilament. Bunker bump into your line, leaving nicks that compromise the strength of your line. Spinning gear will put twist in your line, and the heavier line will magnify the effect of the line twist.



Full article..........



.......R.I.P. I miss U Bro
 
likeitreallyis


Joined: 10/28/2005
Posts: 16948
Location: Rolling in the deep....
 posted 07/13/2008 09:15 AM  

Great post Gary up


Green Grass and High Tides forever,,,
 
gverb1219


Joined: 07/11/2003
Posts: 34945
Location: ....knee deep in the water somewhere
 posted 07/13/2008 10:37 AM  

likeitreallyis wrote:

Great post Gary up




I used to cut my bunker into about 3/4"steakes until I read this article.Roll Believe it or not, after using this method my hook ups improved.up
Cutting off the belly skin part did make a differance because that was the part they chomp. surprise
And by cutting off the useless belly area and using just the "meat", the twist on the line was much less.upup


Tyr it......it does work......upupupup


.......R.I.P. I miss U Bro
 
MickieBelle

Joined: 11/15/2002
Posts: 1206
Location: New Rochelle
 posted 07/13/2008 01:27 PM  

Coupla issues with the artice...

The diagram shows the belly part as "waste" - can't agree with that. This is the best part of the bait; built in chum. On hooking the bait I make cuts 1 and 3 right down through the bottom of the chunk, then to get the most hook exposure, and to put the hook where they'll probably hit, I hook that part throught the bottom "V" of the chunk, that tough membrane piece, going through the guts especially the heart, first to keep them in the chunk. Also, on the hook-up, I wouldn't throw the reel in gear and "wait" for the line to come tight - what if the fish is sitting there with the bait in its mouth -you'll just be giving it time to decide to spit it. I disengage the clicker, reel as fast as I can and then as soon as I feel the weight of the fish I strike. As with anything else, I'm not a fish, never talked to one and don't know for sure, but JMHO. Do whatever works for you.
 
NYBightEditor
Noreast.com Club Member


Noreast Writer

Moderator

Joined: 11/18/2003
Posts: 1513
Location: Great Kills Harbor
 posted 07/13/2008 04:04 PM  

I am honored by you posting my article....I thought it looked familiar. MickieBelle - that diagram is not mine & was not included with my article. In fact, when surfcasting I like to slip a small rubberband around the gutty part of the chunk to be sure that it makes it to the end of my cast - I can't imagine ever calling it waste Shades

As far as "waiting" for the line to come tight, I am usually screaming "reel, reel, reel," while "waiting" for the line to come tight. Too many guys try to set before the slack is out of the line. We are not standing on a corner waiting for the bus. Sorry that was not made clear in the article.


check out my blog - NYC Stripers with Capt. Steve Byrne

This post edited by NYBightEditor 04:16 PM 07/13/2008
 
NYBightEditor
Noreast.com Club Member


Noreast Writer

Moderator

Joined: 11/18/2003
Posts: 1513
Location: Great Kills Harbor
 posted 07/13/2008 04:08 PM  

this is one of the pics I think was in the article...

I don't know what those Hatteras guys are thinking about



check out my blog - NYC Stripers with Capt. Steve Byrne
 
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