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Lionfish have been detected in NY waters

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  Discussion Boards > Fisheries Management
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Vector

Joined: 09/03/2004
Posts: 2868
 posted 10/20/2013 07:42 PM  

I saw a map and their off NY now. Very troubling ! The article I read said local divers in the area speared hundreds of them locally.


This post edited by Vector 07:47 PM 10/20/2013
 
likeitreallyis


Joined: 10/28/2005
Posts: 16948
Location: Rolling in the deep....
 posted 10/20/2013 08:26 PM  

..amazed that all of the DNA so far of the Atlantic invasion are traced to 6 females released as pets in Florida... very scary indeed.


Green Grass and High Tides forever,,,
 
treypescatorie


Joined: 08/27/2001
Posts: 1346
Location: Moriches Bay
 posted 10/20/2013 09:50 PM  

Do they taste good?
 
DarthBaiter


Joined: 05/24/2003
Posts: 8923
Location: Trollin NE for a bite...
 posted 10/20/2013 10:26 PM  

likeitreallyis wrote:

..amazed that all of the DNA so far of the Atlantic invasion are traced to 6 females released as pets in Florida... very scary indeed.


really? surprise






Support your local Mom n Pop stores.

 
hauler


Joined: 03/12/2002
Posts: 3788
 posted 10/21/2013 11:37 AM  

treypescatorie wrote:

Do they taste good?


Funny you said that as I think I heard they actually do.
 
DaveB

Joined: 04/23/2002
Posts: 1387
Location: Tyngsboro, Ma
 posted 10/21/2013 11:59 AM  

treypescatorie wrote:

Do they taste good?

Yes!
Lionfish: If you can't beat 'em, eat 'em
 
MakoMike
Noreast.com Club Member


Noreast Writer

Joined: 12/28/2000
Posts: 71023
Location: Pt. Judith
 posted 10/21/2013 12:32 PM  

treypescatorie wrote:

Do they taste good?


Supposedly they make very good table fare, but they don't get very big, so they are a lot of work to clean.


====MakoMike=====

Click here for The Makomania Sportfishing website

Makomania out
 
emuehlbauer

Joined: 07/04/2003
Posts: 668
Location: Cutchogue/Rego Park
 posted 10/21/2013 04:29 PM  

How do you safely get them off the hook?
 
MakoMike
Noreast.com Club Member


Noreast Writer

Joined: 12/28/2000
Posts: 71023
Location: Pt. Judith
 posted 10/21/2013 05:25 PM  

emuehlbauer wrote:

How do you safely get them off the hook?


Mostly they seem to be caught by spearfishermen. I would guess that if you caught one on hook and line you would have to use some kind of dehooker or wear heavy leather gloves.


====MakoMike=====

Click here for The Makomania Sportfishing website

Makomania out
 
TonySMJC


Joined: 10/06/2005
Posts: 3030
Location: Brooklyn
 posted 10/21/2013 07:13 PM  

Since they are poison and invasive
With no natural local predation
I don't find it very odd that a small amount of
Females laying a good amount of eggs
And a good head start couldn't produce a lot of
Young
Then multiply that and roll it over again

With no predation
Abundant food
Why not?

I'm more surprised that they are thriving in cooler
Waters

And yes ver very tasty
Getting popular in south florida mostly around the keys
I here


Take a kid fishing they are the future of our sport and our world
 
DaveB

Joined: 04/23/2002
Posts: 1387
Location: Tyngsboro, Ma
 posted 10/22/2013 08:23 AM  

MakoMike wrote:

emuehlbauer wrote:

How do you safely get them off the hook?


Mostly they seem to be caught by spearfishermen. I would guess that if you caught one on hook and line you would have to use some kind of dehooker or wear heavy leather gloves.



The poison is located only in the spines. So don't get pricked. The reason that they are mostly harvested by spear fisherman is selectivity. They are deliberately targeting them, killing everyone they can to try to halt their spread. It isn't working though.
 
NilsS

Joined: 09/10/2004
Posts: 1050
Location: Edgewater, Florida and Trenton, New Jersey
 posted 10/24/2013 07:51 AM  

Introduced species "taking over" seems to be a temporary phenomena. There's a lag between the introduced species - in this case lionfish - going through a period of logarithmic growth/range expansion, and local predators figuring out that they're good to eat and then effectively eating them. I'm sure that a lot of you remember the "threat" of the zebra mussels a while back: they were going to clog our waterways, shut down generating stations and on and on, supposedly ushering us into a musseleopolypse. When's the last time you heard about a zebra mussel threat to life, liberty and the American way of life? Ditto the snakehead a few years back. They were going to crawl out of local ponds and rivers into back yards to eat yapping miniature poodles and untended babies. Nature - or an ecosystem if you prefer - tends to be a lot more resilient than a media establishment that thrives on sensationalism would have us believe. Today's exotic threats in a few years tend to become part of the environmental background and I'd bet that lionfish on the East coast follow this pattern.




Nils Stolpe
Garden State Seafood Association


This post edited by NilsS 07:53 AM 10/24/2013
 
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