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Looking for light weight spinner (under 10 onz.) with 12 lbs. of drag or more

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  Discussion Boards > Inshore Tackle and Techniques with Lep
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sealos

Joined: 07/09/2003
Posts: 218
Location: city island
 posted 11/12/2013 07:09 PM  


Hello guys,

Looking for light weight spinner (under 10 onz.) with 12 lbs. of drag or more for under $100. I want to use it for shallow water fluking. I appreciate your suggestions.



 
Fish220sr

Joined: 10/29/2002
Posts: 1621
Location: The Island
 posted 11/12/2013 07:47 PM  

Shimano Stradic 2500fj is within specs, but Over budget. That's the way it goes.




This post edited by Fish220sr 07:53 PM 11/12/2013
 
Flukinit

Joined: 02/28/2002
Posts: 982
Location: Port Jeff, NY
 posted 11/12/2013 09:31 PM  

Penn battle

 
Flukinit

Joined: 02/28/2002
Posts: 982
Location: Port Jeff, NY
 posted 11/12/2013 09:33 PM  

Okuma trio 30
 
Leprechaun
Noreast.com Club Member


Moderator
Inshore Tackle and Techniques with Lep
Fishing Rods
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Joined: 08/11/2000
Posts: 9269
Location: Wantagh/Seaford, N.Y.
 posted 11/13/2013 09:38 AM  

Wait, you want 12lbs of drag to fish for fluke? 12lbs of drag is what an AVET SX gives on nearly full lock down. The same for an Abu 6500. That's one load of drag for fluking.

O.K., assuming that is what you want, I would think any of the reels mentioned above could do it, but I would be concerned whether or not they can provide it with smoothness. I would try before I buy, where this my purchasing determinant.




"Hi, my name is Pete and I have a fishing gear problem."
 
sealos

Joined: 07/09/2003
Posts: 218
Location: city island
 posted 11/13/2013 03:11 PM  



Hey Lep,

Here is my thinking on the 12lbs. of drag. I can find a bunch of baitcasting reels with more the 20 lbs. of drag weighing much less than 10 onz. But very few spinners with that type of drag weighing less tha 10 ounzes. I wonder why that is? Why can't we have lightweight spinners with more cranking power? Here is my thinking. It is not unusual to hook into a 10 lb. blue or a 10lb. to 20 lb. striper while fluke fishing. I've done it, and I'm pretty sure most guys have. We certaily have the lightweight rods to handle such fish. Why not the lightweight spinners?



 
Leprechaun
Noreast.com Club Member


Moderator
Inshore Tackle and Techniques with Lep
Fishing Rods
Posted Reports

Joined: 08/11/2000
Posts: 9269
Location: Wantagh/Seaford, N.Y.
 posted 11/13/2013 04:14 PM  

Well, good question!

A few thoughts on this subject follow.

Those manufacturers that advertise more than 20lbs of drag out of a 10oz baitcaster - like Abu with their Toro reels for instance - are pretty much full of it. In many cases you CAN lock the drag down tight, but there's a big difference between locking it up versus offering a smooth, controllable line payout at such a ridiculously high drag setting. Try it yourself. Rig a drag scale to a Toro and try to pull the rated 25lbs of drag out of it. Yeah, umm, good luck with that! I know, because I've tried it myself, with both a Toro and my own Curado 300E.

I think these reel companies have suckered themselves into an absurd "Specs-manship death-spiral of baloney" with these new larger baitcasters, with each new one claiming to top the last - and now they're stuck.

Not only can't these reels reliably produce such high drag settings without all kinds of internal issues (not to mention potential damage to the accompanying rod that it's mounted to), but to mislead based on such claims is well, just unethical, in my opinion.

That's one thing. Now as to why a spinner in the same relatively inexpensive price range cannot generate this kind of (mythical) drag pressure - it goes to exactly what a spinner is, and is not.

The dynamics of a spinner are total different than a revolving spool reel. The spinner takes the torque that you put thru the handle, which turns the main gear, and rotates that torque 90-degrees while moving the rotor circularly around the spool. There is a HUGH loss of efficiency in this line spooling method, the result of which is that you simply cannot depend on a small spinner to crank a large fish to the boat, as you can with the much more efficient revolving spool.

All sorts of things will happen whilst subjecting a typical spinner to heavy pressure - rotors flex, bail arms distort, pinion gears misalign, etc. All these issues contribute to this problem.

Certainly the big players in the reel business have made efforts to address this "lack of power" problem, with Shimano offering their "X-Ship" enhanced pinion support system, Daiwa with their Zion rotor cups and Air Bail assembly, and other such engineering Band-aids - but there's just no getting around the fact that spinners lack the ground-pounding torque that most revolving spool reels can easily generate.

In order to find a spinner that will produce eye-popping cranking torque, you have to look up-market, to reels that cost a really dear amount. Certainly Daiwa and Shimano have designed spinning reels that can crank in large tunas and other blue-water species, the Daiwa DogFight and Shimano Stella SW reels are the most famous of these - both of which are said to generate approx. 60lbs of drag. Very impressive, but wow, what prices - which is indicative of the amount of research, premium materials and ultra-precise machining that are incorporated into those reels in order to achieve such redockulous drag settings.

And STILL, while watching "tuna fishing with spinners" videos on You Tube I see that the exact same pumping action is required at that level of fish fighting that we utilize while pulling a 12lb bluefish to the boat with our "lesser" spinning rigs. So I suppose some things never change, the fish only get bigger.

Any of the reels mentioned in this thread are pretty good pieces. Me? I'm partial to my old-school Penn 550SS. Solid aluminum frame, marine bronze and stainless steel internals - it was designed back before all this fancy new technology and "miracle" thermoplastic materials - and in 35 years of ownership its never needed a single part to be replaced. Is it heavy? Yep. Not really all that smooth? Yep. Bulletproof, Yepppp . . . But If you can find a mint 450SS, THAT'S the reel that I recommend for you. It features great engineering/construction, top-flight materials and an excellent drag setup. Hint: A certain large auction site has really mint ones come up regularly. . .


"Hi, my name is Pete and I have a fishing gear problem."

This post edited by Leprechaun 10:36 PM 11/13/2013
 
sealos

Joined: 07/09/2003
Posts: 218
Location: city island
 posted 11/13/2013 05:50 PM  


Lep,

Thanks for that detailed breakdown. The way you explained it it makes plenty of sense. Still, it would be nice if they manufactured such a spinner at a reasonanable price. Interesting, that brought up the old Penns 450SS and 550SS. Its been years since I used the 450SS reel. I like that 450SS idea, unfortunately, that reel would be a touch heavy for the lightweight rods I have in mind. Right now it appears that I would just have to concentrate on the fluke and take my chances with accidental by-catch (mainly the bluefish). With everything being said so far, I'm leaning towards a Shimano 2000 type reel or the Okuma trio 30.









 
Flukinit

Joined: 02/28/2002
Posts: 982
Location: Port Jeff, NY
 posted 11/13/2013 05:57 PM  

[quote=sealos]
Lep,

Thanks for that detailed breakdown. The way you explained it it makes plenty of sense. Still, it would be nice if they manufactured such a spinner at a reasonanable price. Interesting, that brought up the old Penns 450SS and 550SS. Its been years since I used the 450SS reel. I like that 450SS idea, unfortunately, that reel would be a touch heavy for the lightweight rods I have in mind. Right now it appears that I would just have to concentrate on the fluke and take my chances with accidental by-catch (mainly the bluefish). With everything being said so far, I'm leaning towards a Shimano 2000 type reel or the Okuma trio 30.

/quote]
I have the Okuma Trio 30 and like it. Plenty for any fluke out there could also handle blues and bass if needed. As I said also check ut the penn battle i don't have one but my friend uses it in the ocean and has had no issues handling any fluke out there. Both are under $100. Good luck.
 
sealos

Joined: 07/09/2003
Posts: 218
Location: city island
 posted 11/13/2013 06:21 PM  


Hey Flukenit,

The Okuma trio 30 is at the top of my list even though I couldn't find the drag on it anywhere. Looks like it could beat up on any fluke. That is followed by the Shimano Sedona 2000 or the Symetry. I looked at the Penn battle but I scratched it off the list.



 
Flukinit

Joined: 02/28/2002
Posts: 982
Location: Port Jeff, NY
 posted 11/13/2013 06:40 PM  

sealos wrote:


Hey Flukenit,

The Okuma trio 30 is at the top of my list even though I couldn't find the drag on it anywhere. Looks like it could beat up on any fluke. That is followed by the Shimano Sedona 2000 or the Symetry. I looked at the Penn battle but I scratched it off the list.




The okuma is very nice and can beat any fluke out there. I got mine a last year at the somerset show on Petes (Lep)recommendation as we were there together. Great little reel. Sedona is nice I only suggested the Penn as you were looking under a $100 I'm not a Penn guy just figured I'd throw it out there.
 
JohnTFT


Joined: 03/21/2006
Posts: 1154
Location: 434 Rutgers Road West Babylon
 posted 11/13/2013 08:00 PM  

Ok - the price is the deciding factor here. For durability and drag pressure the Battle would be the choice.

I agree with Pete on all points and would save a bit more and purchase a Stradic CI4 or 4+.

These are the nicest reels I have ever fished with and sold.

The Trio 30 has the price point but is lacking in the durability department. 5 failures on main gears this season returned to the shop.

In all of the cases!of Battles we have sold only one defect. Legitimate as well the reel was assembled incorrectly.

The Stradic cI4 & 4+ - are off the charts in every area. Weight, drag, materials and durability.

I am hearing in the grapevine that ABU is coming out with a spinner that is world class and slightly higher than the Battle in price point. Stay tuned.

Thanks,

John





Trophy Fishing Tackle
434 Rutgers Road
West Babylon NY, 11704
631-274-7042
Trophy Tackle
 
skatemaster

Joined: 08/02/2002
Posts: 1183
 posted 11/13/2013 08:47 PM  

http://www.basspro.com/Shimano-Spheros-Offshore-Spinning-Reels/product/103536/

Close on paper, but come on, 12lbs or 22 lbs of drag on a bucktail rod? The same drag that we use when fighting a tuna with a 50w? Yeah right.
 
howell1641


Joined: 09/30/2009
Posts: 124
Location: Moriches NY
 posted 11/14/2013 12:06 PM  

Quantum smoke 25 7.6oz 16lbs of drag or the 30 18lbs of drag at 8 oz. The 40 is to much for inshore fluking ive caught 35 lbs bass on it. A little more then 100 but worth the 179 price tag. Its a beauty. I also have the battle 4000 and love that one also. Good reel for 100 bucks. Goog luck. Dont know where you are located but go down to a place like j and h they have a huge selection on had. Your best bet is put them in your hand and feel them you will find something there
 
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